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  • Students receive accolades

    011A5887TONY FARKAS | TCNS Students gathered to be recognized for their achievements.

    Academics, sports accomplishments noted with plaques, scholarships

    By Tony Farkas

    TRINITY — Athletic Director Patrick Goodman said the students and athletes of the school needed to be recognized for their efforts after such a tumultuous year, which teachers and coaches did at the annual awards ceremony, held Thursday.

    Thousands of dollars in scholarships and numerous awards were given to the students that excelled throughout the year.

    Goodman also brought back the tradition of naming athletes who went above and beyond — the Tiger Heart Award — which went to Zoey Grey and Emilio Cleveland. He also started an all-around athlete award, which went to Cynthia Sizemore and Treylin Goodman.

    Other awards include:

    UIL Academic Results

    District

    Brooke Kelley, first place Ready Writing; Emilio Cleveland, third place Computer Apps; Diego Lewin, fourth place Computer Apps; Hunter Cassidy, third place Current Issues, fifth place Computer Apps; Kaitlyn Smith, second place Prose Interpretation, third place Persuasive Speaking; Allie Ancira, fourth place Prose Interpretation; Izaiah Fortenberry, second place Informative Speaking; Paton Mauldin, second place Biology, third place Chemistry, fourth place Physics; Zachary Thibodeaux, second place Chemistry.

    Team Results

    First place, Science: Hunter Cassidy, Emilio Cleveland, Paton Mauldin, Zach Thibodeaux.

    Second place, Current Issues and Events: Hunter Cassidy, Emilio Cleveland, Paton Mauldin, Candida Guzman.

    Regional Results

    Izaiah Fortenberry, seventh place Informative Speaking; Kaitlyn Smith, fifth Persuasive Speaking; Zachary Thibodeaux, fourth place Biology.

    Sports Awards

    Cross country

    Boys and girls track

    Ava Morrison, cross country/track, regional cross country and area track, first-year letter winner; Kemberlie Caceras, track, area track, first-year letter winner; LaResa Green, track, area and regional qualifier, first-year letter winner; Aaliyah Hale, track, Area, first-year letter winner; Yesica Lopez, track , first-year letter winner; Yasmin Moore, track, area and regional qualifier, first-year letter winner; Daria Woods, track, Area track, first-year letter winner; Shania English, 23-3A District Champion 400 Meters, area and regional qualifier, Victoria Smith, area qualifier, Shelby Walters, Pole Vault, 23-3A District Champion Area Champion and regional qualifier, Anaya Weathersby, area and regional qualifier, Myona Wilson, area and regional qualifier, Zoey Gray, area qualifier, Cole Caldwell, first-Year track letter winner; Julian Clayborne, first-year track letter winner, area qualifier; Austin Cummins, first-year track letter winner; Marshall Sizemore, first-year track letter winner; Zylon Woods, first-year track letter winner; Tristan Williams, first-year track letter winner; Kaden Barnes, first-year track letter winner.

    Tennis

    Olivia Kitts, first-year letter winner, 23-3A second-place regional qualifier girls doubles; Natalie Bates, first-year letter winner, 23-3A second-regional qualifier girls doubles; Andrea Hickman, 23-3A District Champions girls doubles and regional qualifier; Gabby Kaufman, 23-3A District Champions girls doubles and regional qualifier, Team MVP; Dylan Ford, 3rd place boys singles; Paton Mauldin, Letter Award Winner

    Volleyball

    Cynthia Sizemore, first-team All-District, Co-MVP; Aniya Phillips, second-team All-District, Co-MVP.

    Soccer

    Melissa Acosta, first-year letter winner

    Athletic training, student aides

    Gabrielle Potts, 2 Years Varsity, first-year Letter Award Winner; Morgan Allbright, 2 Years Varsity, first-year Letter Award Winner

    Football, Bi-District Finalist

    Julian Clayborne, first-year letter winner; Navjot Gill, first-year letter winner, Academic All-District , UIL Scholar Award; Cole Hortman, first-year letter winner; Kaden Barnes, first-year letter winner; Romero Lopez, first-year letter winner; Trintin Fulsom, first-year letter winner, Academic All-District ; Randall Dumas, first-year letter winner, Academic All-District; Cole Odom, first-year letter winner; Treylin Goodman, Trinity first-team Running Back and second-team linebacker; Austin Cummins, Trinity, first-team Offensive Line and first-team Defensive Line, Academic All-District; Emilio Cleveland, Trinity, second-team Offensive Line , Academic All-District, UIL Scholar Award; Andrew Crabtree, Trinity, second-team Defensive Line; Fidencio Ruiz, Trinity, second-team Defensive Line, Academic All-District, UIL Scholar Award; Colton Smith, OL, Trinity, second-team Offensive Line

    Boys and girls basketball, Bi-District Finalist

    Nevaeh Craft, second-team All-District; Shania English, Honorable, Mention All-District; Peyton Robb, first-team All-District; Cynthia Sizemore, first-team All-District; Treylin Goodman, first-team All-District; Jakai Miller-Gates, first-team All-District; Terius Maxie, first-team All-District; Fermin Aleman, second-team All-District; Quinn Mack, Honorable Mention All-District, first-year Letter Award Winner; Tristian Martinez, first-year Letter Award Winner, Honorable Mention All-District, Academic All-District, ; Marshall Sizemore, first-year Letter Award Winner, Academic All-District; Cameron Anderson, first-year Letter Award Winner, Academic All-District; Cole Hortman, first-year Letter Award Winner

    Baseball

    Cole Hortman, first-year Letter Award Winner; Romero Lopez, first-year Letter Award Winner; Remi Lassman, first-year Letter Award Winner; David McKendree, first-year Letter Award Winner; Tristan Williams, first-year Letter Award Winner.

    Golf

    Anneliese Beasley, 23-3A Medalist, regional qualifier; Emilio Cleveland , Academic All-District; Hunter Cassidy, Academic All-District, UIL Scholar Athlete; Tyler Calloway, Academic All-District.

    Boys and girls powerlifting

    Deandra Mills, regional qualifier/medalist; Alyssa Hill, regional qualifier; Maria Mendoza, regional qualifier, first-year Letter Award Winner; Kailyn Fisher, Regional Champion, State Champion; Treylin Goodman, regional qualifier/medalist; Austin Cummins, regional qualifier.

    Softball

    Cynthia Sizemore, Defensive MVP; Dayanara Martinez, Utility Player of the Year, first-year Letter Award Winner; Peyton Robb, first-team All-District; Nevaeh Craft, second-team All-District; Abby Crowton, first-year Letter Award Winner; Brooke Arnold, first-year Letter Award Winner; Yasmin Moore, first-year Letter Award Winner.

  • Taking the next step

    060321 groveton gradCourtesy photo | Martha Mericle Groveton ISD seniors celebrate their commencement with the traditional tossing of the mortarboards at the High School graduation on Friday.

    By Tony Farkas

    GROVETON — The Groveton High School on Friday celebrated the first post-pandemic graduation in style, and said farewell to 63 seniors with righteous pomp and circumstance.

    Family and friends cheered and hollered in the red-bedecked gymnasium, as the event was moved from the stadium due to weather, and the excitement was palatable.

    After a recitation of negativity that many students may feel, Valedictorian Emily Ecord said that students can be so focused on reaching the final goal that they lose sight of the importance of the individual moments.

    “It undermines the value you have in yourself, and the value you have in each of your peers,” she said. “Those moments make up your life.”

    Ecord also thanked the many people that have helped her find those moments throughout her high-school career.

    Salutatorian Cole Sullivan congratulated his fellow classmates in the best way possible, by evoking Dr. Seuss.

    “He teaches us life lessons — friendships, bonds, achievements, the hiccups, the failures, successes and relations,” he said. “Even though most people think of the ugly hairy cat in the red-and-white striped hat, Dr. Seuss went way beyond that.”

    Sullivan listed the five “simple” life lessons that he and his classmates could use from now on:

    • “Today, you are you, that’s truer than true. There is no one alive that is you-er than you.”
    • “Why fit in when you are born to stand out.”
    • “You have brains in your head, and feet in your shoes, you can steer yourself in any direction you choose.”
    • “Be who you are, and say what you think, because those who mind don’t matter, and those who matter don’t mind.”
    • “Today, I shall behave as if this is the day I will be remembered.”
  • The jihad against the truth continues unabated

    tony farkasFILE PHOTO Tony Farkas

    “It appeared that there had even been demonstrations to thank Big Brother for raising the chocolate ration to twenty grams a week. And only yesterday (…) it had been announced that the ration was to be reduced to twenty grams a week. Was it possible that they could swallow that, after only twenty-four hours? Yes, they swallowed it. …” — George Orwell, “1984”

    It’s long been understood by tinpot dictators, socialists and pretty much everybody that if you control information, you control society.

    Propaganda was a key ingredient in Hitler’s rise to power in Germany. He even had a director that made sure the precise message was delivered.

    I’m not at this point equating this country to pre-World War II Germany, nor am I calling anyone fascists.

    I am, however, expressing my dismay at the state of the news media, especially at the national level. There are many times, and it’s growing in frequency, that I lament my chosen profession has become a parody of itself, choosing to embrace access instead of objectivity and celebrity instead of credibility.

    But I led off with the Orwell quote because something alarming came across my radar last week, and it frankly chilled me. I wouldn’t even deny being gobsmacked.

    According to numerous outlets, as well as the paper itself, the Boston Globe is starting what it calls the Fresh Start Initiative. It will allow people to petition the paper to have stories published by the newspaper and placed on the website edited to remove names, add updated information or have it removed from Google searches.

    The reasoning is to allow people to craft a future without the baggage of the past interfering.

    Other outlets, such as the Washington Post and the Cleveland Plain Dealer, are doing the very same things.

    Now let’s be clear here. It’s not like the newspapers are changing the events — yet. What’s happening is supposedly designed to help people move on without the baggage of a past arrest. Yet that’s not what happened in the case of Vice President Kamala Harris.

    The Post heavily edited a story in which Harris made a quote — which was not incorrect or wrongly reported — that portrayed the then-candidate for president in a bad light. The Post waved its magic wand and changed the story.

    It wasn’t until it was noticed and written about in Reason Magazine that the Post put the original story back up. However, the edited version remained, and the reader was given a choice of which way to go.

    As with the stories and posts about arrests, what Harris did was news, and was reported correctly. That is not up for dispute. But much as Winston Smith was changing headlines to make a news piece about chocolate rations positive, so is this trend.

    In the cases of arrests, I fully believe that finishing the story is right, and if a suspect is exonerated, it should be written about. That’s just good, responsible journalism, and that’s following the story to its conclusion.

    But changing the original should never be done, for one simple reason — it’s still the truth.

    This profession, or trade if you will, at its core is about the truth. We present the information, and it’s up to the reader to decide what to think about it. Sure, we have opinion pages (like where this column is), but that is clearly marked and its clearly understood that a column is the opinion of the writer.

    When that creeps into a story, or when stories and events in those stories are erased or changed based on nothing more than it hurts someone’s feelings, that’s really not how journalism works.

    Most parents will agree that children are taught that actions have consequences. If the action is egregious enough, it’s a distinct possibility it will end up in a news report, and that is assuredly a consequence.

    But whitewashing a truth is no benefit. And it’s not journalism.

    Tony Farkas is editor of the Trinity County News-Standard. He can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

  • The liberal agenda has nothing to do with liberty

    tony farkasFILE PHOTO Tony Farkas

    By Tony Farkas

    I remember with pride the first time I was able to vote.

    Like most first-timers, I was pretty scared going into the booth, as back then, it was the old-timey lever models that looked like a mad scientist’s workstation. (Although it wasn’t too awful long before they were replaced by fill-in-the-blank style cards.)

    It wasn’t so much that I was powerful, but that I was actually participating in a process that truly made our country unique. I wasn’t too naïve to believe that my one vote made all that much difference, but I did believe that mine, along with a whole lot of others, sent a message to our officials.

    There actually wasn’t any resemblance to “Swing Vote,” a silly little movie starring Kevin Costner. (I’m fond of this movie it because it was set in a town that was 8 miles from where I lived — Texico, N.M.)

    In that movie, the future of the presidency came down to one vote needing to be recast, and the hilarity that ensues when the press, the candidates and the world turns its attention to this sleepy little border town.

    While dumb in the extreme, and incredibly implausible, it did serve to highlight the importance of voting.

    Our republic was founded on a principle: of the people, by the people, for the people. We get that from the ballots we cast. Somewhere along the way, though, our officials, particularly at the federal level (as well as plenty of states), have determined that we are governed by consent, not ruled by edict, fiat, or executive order.

    That’s what the vote protects, and serves, and now, it’s coming under fire — wrapped up in the guise of making elections safe and fair and wholesome and puppies and such.

    H.R. 1, which has been passed by the House and is being considered in the Senate, and is monumentally misnamed the For the People Act, is supposed to correct voting irregularities and make things uniform across the country.

    Instead, it will for all intents and purposes give the federal government control of what is enshrined in the constitution as something that belongs to the states. This is accomplished by oversight committees, and require states to comply with regulations designed to allow more people to vote.

    Certain things, like not requiring signatures, same-day voter registration, internet registration, curbside voting, and other ridiculous ideas will be required. Given the federal government’s history, once it gets its claws into something, it never lets it go. Ever.

    And since the government thinks that it is entitled to all the money, it also thinks that money is a club, and so states will lose funding for things because the government will hold up payments unless its edicts are followed.

    This has happened with just about everything; the one that sticks out in my mind is during the Clinton administration. States had to adopt a .08 BAC presumption of intoxication or risk losing highway construction funds.

    These are our rights , and this is our money, and our government threatens them regularly and with gusto, and it is done under the guise of doing what’s right (or, if you prefer, what’s best for us).

    Whether there was any immediate and glaring proof of election fraud or inequality, there was enough credible, albeit anecdotal, evidence that a full-scale investigation should have been done. Only now is one of many states reporting irregularities conducting an audit — Arizona — which is facing stiff opposition by the feds to leave things be.

    By extension, if that turns out to be the case, then it is imperative that signatures and ID be required during elections, since, as Scotty says, the more they overthink the plumbing, the easier it is to stop up the drain (meaning, technology is easy to tamper with.)

    The upshot is, the government needs to follow, not lead, and not try to rig the game in its favor, and there’s only one way to correct the ship.

    Vote.

    Tony Farkas is editor of the Trinity County News-Standard. He can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

  • Tigers clinch playoff berth (VIDEO)

    110520 trinity 2TONY FARKAS | TCNS Trinity Tiger wide receiver Jamarian Hall runs through trouble during a Friday, Oct. 30, game against the Westwood Panthers. Trinity won the game 34-28.

    By Scott Womack
    TCNS Correspondent

    TRINITY — The Tigers entered the 2020 season with one goal, to advance to the playoffs. A 34-28 victory over the Westwood Panthers made that goal a reality.

    The victory was accomplished by a strong running game by Trey Goodman, who contributed 285 rushing yards and one passing touchdown; a defense that made timely stops and intercepted Panther passes three times, one resulting in a touchdown; and special teams that was able to recover an attempted onside kick that sealed the victory for the Tigers.

    The Tigers struck early with a 66-yard touchdown run by Goodman on just the second play from scrimmage. However, the Panthers were able to control the ball on their opening possession for a 15-play touchdown drive to take a 7-6 lead into the second quarter.

    Westwood scored early in the second quarter and take a 14-6 lead. With 2:24 left in the first half, Goodman was able to pick off a Panther pass and return it to the 24-yard line giving the Tigers a chance to even the score before halftime. Two plays later the Tigers gave up the ball on an interception.

    A timely stop by the defense forced the Panthers to punt. With just 25 seconds left in the second quarter the Tigers had one last opportunity to score. The Tigers needed one play for Goodman to find the end zone from a 35-yard run. Adding the 2-point conversion, the Tigers and Panthers entered halftime tied at 14.

    The Tigers took the lead for good on their opening possession of the third quarter when Goodman found Jamarian Hall for a 32-yard touchdown pass. The Panthers next offensive possession resulting in a T.J. Jaramillo interception on the Tiger 14-yard line. On the Tigers third play, Goodman broke free for a 78-yard touchdown run giving the Tigers a 28-14 lead heading into the fourth quarter.

    110520 trinity 1TONY FARKAS | TCNS Trey Goodman (No. 3) finds room for the Trinity Tigers’ opening drive score, scampering 66 yards on Friday, Oct. 30, in Trinity. The Tigers downed the Westwood Panthers 34-28.

    Trinity then drove to the Panther 28 yard line, but turned the ball over to the Panthers on a fourth-down run that came up short. An incompletion, a Raymond Balli sack and an interception returned 21 yards for a score by Romero Lopez gave the Tigers a commanding 24-14 lead with 6:47 left in the game.

    The Panthers made the game interesting by taking just over two minutes to score and another touchdown with just 1:09 left to play. Leading by 6 points, the Tigers lined up for a Panther onside kick, and with the recovery, the Tigers special team was able to seal the win.

    The win puts Trinity into the 2020 playoffs. The Tigers will end the regular season on the road against the Crockett Bulldogs, the winner of which will enter the playoffs as the No. 3 seed. With a win the Tigers will own their first winning regular season and district winning record in several years.

    Kickoff is scheduled for 7 p.m.; once all the games become final, the Tigers will know their playoff opponent.

     

  • Trinity boys outclassed in season opener

    GBKB2TONY FARKAS | TCN Trinity Lady Tiger Rayn Balli (No. 22) drives around Groveton defenders during a Nov. 7 game in Trinity. The Lady Tigers defeated the Lady Indians 44-22.

    By Tony Farkas

    TRINITY — An extended football season led to a late start for the Trinity Tigers’ basketball squad, and the lack of playing time may have led to the 88-33 loss to Livingston on Friday in the teams’ first game.

    Livingston took advantage of more playing time, as well as a distinct height advantage, during the game.

    Head Coach Jacoby Mitchell said there was only five days of practice before their season opener, and that combined with having some key starters out was a factor in the loss.

    “We had too many turnovers, we have to take care of ball better than that,” Mitchell said. “We have to work on taking great shots, not just good shots.”

    Trinity now stands 0-1 on the season, and Livingston improved its record to 2-0.

    Mitchell said his top producers in the game were Jakai Miller-Gates, who scored 13 points, and Terius Maxie, who dropped in 10 points.

    Area Roundup

    Boys Basketball

    • Apple Springs (0-2)
    • Nov. 20 vs. Spurger, 75-40 loss.
    • Nov. 17 vs Chester, 45-43 loss.
    • Groveton (1-0)
    • Nov. 14 vs. Westwood, 55-47 win.

    Girls Basketball

    TRINITY — A cross-county rivalry left the Lady Tigers with a 44-22 win over the Lady Indians on Nov. 7.

    The win puts Trinity at 3-1 while Groveton drops to 0-2.

    Girls basketball roundup

    Apple Springs:

    • Nov. 10 vs. Zavalla, 45-42 loss.
    • Nov. 17 vs. Chester, 32-28 loss.

    Groveton:

    • Nov. 13 vs. San Augustine: 41-37 loss.

    Trinity:

    • Nov. 10 vs. Hearne, 56-42 loss.
    • Nov. 13 vs. Latexo, 48-22 win.
    • Nov. 14 vs. Centerville, 37-34 win.
  • Trinity City Council taking it to the streets

    trinity txFILE PHOTO Trinity, TX

    By Tony Farkas

    TRINITY — The Trinity City Council will be looking into some financing to resurface a few roads.

    At its regular meeting on Thursday, the council authorized seeking $500,000 to chip seal roads.

    Council Member Bubba Smith said that he had a problem with getting money without having a clear purpose; however, Mayor Wayne Huffman said the loan would not be signed until the city determined what roads were in most need of repair.

    Huffman said there will be a work session at a later date to decide the order, and all council members will have input.

    The Economic Development Board initially planned to loan the city the funds at 1.5 percent interest, but it was later determined that might not be legal. Huffman said then they will seek the funds from the bank, but will need to negotiate a lower interest rate than 4 percent.

    During the public forum, Smith said he has been receiving complaints about certain properties that are cluttered with junk and have become eyesores, particularly a property near the intersection of Church and Elm streets.

    Smith said the mess was bad enough that if anyone were to park in the roadway across the street, all traffic would be blocked.

    Council Member Clegg DeWalt expressed frustration, saying he has tried for years to get something done.

    However, Jones, who also serves as police chief, said that in the past when he went to enforce the city’s nuisance ordinances, he was stopped by the city council. He also said the resident of the house in question has been approached many times and nothing has come of it.

    Jones also said that he would begin enforcing the ordinances, but it will need to be done across the board.

    In other business, the council:

    • approved an order certifying that all city candidates were unopposed in the May 1 election;
    • approved an order cancelling the May 1 city election;
    • approved the annual Racial Profiling Report for the Police Department;
    • approved a request from the city’s Economic Development Board to loan $20,000 to the city for a July 4 celebration; and
    • approved an application for a $500,000 grant through the Texas Community Development Block Grant program for water system improvements.
  • Trinity County approves contract with Groveton EMS

    trinityFILE PHOTO - Trinity County courthouse

    By Tony Farkas

    GROVETON — The Trinity County Commissioners Court now has a new contract with Groveton EMS for ambulance services, but not without some discussion as to the nature of the $1,500 monthly payment.

    While both the county and Groveton EMS agree that ambulance service is needed, the county on Nov. 10 approved a $1,500 monthly stipend, while the EMS service sought a contract that was based on a fee for services.

    Grover Worsham, who owned the service and sold it to current owner David Robison, said he understood Robison’s position, but the real issue was getting the ambulances to run.

    Robison initially asked for the contract to read fee for services as it would benefit the organization in the long run; his argument was that the language made the difference between a vendor relationship and a dependent relationship. However, County Judge Doug Page said the contract will read subsidy based on advice from County Attorney Joe Warner Bell.

    In the end, both sides agreed that it would be best to end the negotiations and approve the contract. The previous contract expired in December 2019. This contract will last seven years with a 90-day right of termination.

    In other business, the county:

    • canvassed the county votes from the Nov. 3 General Election;
    • approved $332,106 from the October check register;
    • approved a budget amendment moving $7,952 into the general fund;
    • approved issuing a county credit card to Sheriff Woody Wallace;
    • approved disbursing Family Protection Fee funds to three county agencies;
    • approved the sale of surplus equipment;
    • approved bids for the sale of tax resale properties from the County Appraisal District; and
    • approved a resolution authorizing $35,000 in county funds as part of a Community Development Block Grant, a project sponsored by the Deep East Texas Council of Government, for the improvement of regional radio communications infrastructure.
  • Trinity County Basketball Score Roundup

    121720 bkb 1TONY FARKAS | TCNS Trinity Tiger Terius Maxie (No. 22 white) goes over a Lovelady defender during the team’s Dec. 8 matchup, which Trinity won 59-51.

    BOYS BASKETBALL

    Trinity

    Dec. 12 vs. Alpha Omega, 68-53 loss.

    Dec. 8 vs. Lovelady, 59-51 win.

    Groveton

    Dec. 11 vs. Hemphill, 56-35 loss.

    Centerville

    No scores reported

    Apple Springs

    Dec. 11 vs. Colmesneil, 58-25 loss

    Dec. 8 vs. Zavalla, 45-36 win

     

    121720 bkb 3COURTESY PHOTO A host of Groveton Lady Indians go for the ball during the team’s win over Lovelady on Friday.

    GIRLS BASKETBALL

    Trinity

    Dec. 11 vs. Tarkington, 55-44 loss.

    Dec. 8 vs. Corrigan-Camden, 64-31 win.

    Groveton

    No scores reported.

    Centerville

    No scores reported

    Apple Springs

    Dec. 11 vs. Kennard, 36-21 win.

    Dec. 8 vs. Neches, 62-15 loss.

  • Trinity County citizens eager to vote

    101520 votingPhoto by Tony Farkas | TCNS Trinity residents wait outside the city Fire Department on the first day of early voting for the 2020 general election.

  • Trinity County Fair and Youth Livestock Show 2021 Results (GALLERY)

    untitled 2TONY FARKAS | TCNS Centerville ISD Ag Teacher Kelly Dial shows students the proper way to transport chickens during the Broiler Show during the Trinity County Fair and Livestock Sale on Wednesday.

    TCNS STAFF

    The Trinity County Fair and Youth Livestock Show 2021 was a complete show, judging all animals and placing all projects. The sale generated approximately $169,850 in sales and $20,975 in add-ons.

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    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

    Fair Results

    Market Fryers

    Lexi Larson, Groveton 4-H, Grand Champion; Parker Leach, East County 4-H, Reserve Champion; Adriana Sottosanti, Groveton 4-H, 3rd; Cade Mauldin, Trinity 4-H, 4th; Gunner Hollis, East County 4-H, 5th; Faith Smith, East County 4-H, 6th; Reece Watts, Groveton 4-H, 7th; Braxton Rogers, Centerville 4-H, 8th; Clarissa Ashworth, Centerville FFA, 9th; Kenneth Smith, East County 4-H, 10th; Tripp Turner, East County 4-H, 11th; Mikala Rivers, Groveton 4-H, 12th; Aurora Gonzalez, 13th; Cooper Shanafelt, Groveton 4-H, 14th; Payzlea Davis, East County 4-H, 15th; Wesson Burriss, Groveton 4-H, 16th; Skyler Shaw, Groveton FFA, 17th; Klarysa Peterson, Centerville 4-H, 18th; Samatha Hittner, Groveton 4-H, 19th; Rebecca Braswell, Centerville 4-H, 20th; Hunter Anderson, Centerville 4-H, 21st, Madelyn Bergman, Groveton FFA, 22nd; Dailey Turner, 23rd, Hannah Turner, East County 4-H, 24th; Madison Haislip, Groveton 4-H, 25th; Bentley Thompson, Groveton 4-H, 26th; Mekenna Meshell, Trinity 4-H, 27th.

    Market Broilers

    Haygen Townsend, Groveton 4-H, Grand Champion; Rhett Hawkins, Groveton 4-H, Reserve Champion; Tristin Eddins, East County 4-H, 3rd; Logan Townsend, Groveton FFA, 4th; Avery Brown, Centerville 4-H, 5th; Hardy Brown, Centerville 4-H, 6th; Trey Page, Groveton 4-H, 7th; Samantha McMullen, Apple Springs FFA, 8th; Jake Snyder, Centerville 4-H, 9th; Payson Dickinson, Centerville FFA, 10th; Aiden Conner, East County 4-H, 11th; Zoey Perez, Groveton 4-H, 12th; Gabriel (Julio) Perez, Groveton 4-H, 13th.

    Market Steers

    Laney Peterson, East County 4-H, Grand Champion; Kayla Kembro, Trinity 4-H, Reserve Champion; Andrew Kembro, Trinity 4-H, 3rd; Makala Rowe, 4th; Lucas Sottosanti, Groveton 4-H, 5th; Cade White, East County 4-H, 6th; Clayton Tullos, Apple Springs FFA, 7th; Reese White, Groveton FFA, 8th; Madison Nash, Groveton FFA, 9th; Brody Thornton, Groveton FFA, 10th; Austin Wallace, Trinity 4-H, 11th; Alivia Wallace, Trinity FFA, 12th.

    Market Lambs

    Malley Ecord, Groveton 4-H, Grand Champion; Megan Hannah, Groveton 4-H, Reserve Champion; Abbey Thornton, Groveton 4-H, 3rd; Katie Davis, East County 4-H, 4th; Brenley Fuller, Groveton 4-H, 5th.

    Commercial Heifers

    Emily Ecord, Groveton FFA, Grand Champion; Conner King, Groveton 4-H, Reserve Champion; Reed Hawkins, Groveton 4-H, 3rd; Rylie Due, Groveton 4-H, 4th; Cash Moore, Groveton 4-H, 5th; Cole Sullivan, Groveton 4-H, 6th; Jasper Due, Groveton 4-H, 7th; Hannah Page, Groveton 4-H, 8th; Lauren Moore, Groveton 4-H, 9th; Haley Denman, Apple Springs FFA, 10th; Jack Sullivan, Groveton 4-H, 11th.

    Swine

    Landree Martin, Grand Champion; Jace Taylor, Groveton 4-H, Reserve Champion; Peyton Noack, Centerville 4-H, 3rd; Kaileigh Lopez, 4th; Chase Blair, 5th; Colter Hajovsky, 6th; Jackson Cathey, 7th; Hayley Hajek, 8th; Chasity Blair, Groveton 4-H, 9th; Tanner Steubing, 10th; Kade Rosser, 11th; Kutter Minter, Groveton 4-H, 12th; Asa Stewart, Groveton 4-H, 13th; James Hennigan, Centerville FFA, 14th; Ethan Bowling, Groveton 4-H, 15th; Trey Brooks, 16th; Mercedes Wilson, Groveton 4-H, 17th; Laura Rogers, Centerville 4-H, 18th; Gracie May, Centerville FFA, 19th; Ashton Ashford, 20th; A.J. Lopez, Groveton 4-H, 21st; Raylee Boggs, Centerville 4-H, 22nd; Darbi Parker, Groveton 4-H, 23rd; Brance Dial, Centerville 4-H, 24th; Addison Randal, Groveton 4-H, 25th; Jill Watts, 26th; Ian Utz, 27th; Alexis May, Centerville FFA, 28th; Milton Riley Pitts, 29th; Serenity Stanley, 30th; Kyleigh Eddins, Centerville 4-H, 31st; Ethan Rutledge, Centerville FFA, 32nd; Jada Welch, Centerville FFA, 33rd; Sarah Sallas, 34th; Hunter Bowling, Groveton 4-H, 35th; Savannah Woodrick, 36th; Cooper Campbell, East County 4-H, 37th; Wyatt Turner, East County 4-H, 38th; Katie Blanchard, 39th; Ty Havard, Centerville FFA, 40th; Melony Allen, 41st; Gage Hollis, Apple Springs FFA, 42nd; Hunter Davis, Apple Springs FFA, 43rd; Wesley Maxfield, Centerville FFA, 44th; Weston Dial, Centerville FFA, 45th; Kate Roger, Centerville FFA, 46th; Colton Brausell, Centerville FFA, 47th; Daniel Brister, Centerville 4-H, 48th; Jaycee Hildebrand, East County 4-H, 49th; Kayla Mott, Centerville FFA, 50th; Kathryn Turner, Apple Springs FFA, 51st; Samantha Smith, Centerville FFA, 52nd.

    Goats

    Brianna Davison, Groveton FFA, Grand Champion; Karly Abshier, Groveton 4-H, Reserve Champion; Jett Arbuckle, Groveton 4-H, 3rd; Anna LaRue, 4th; Ayla Abshier, Groveton 4-H, 5th; Marlie Murray, East County 4-H, 6th; Maycynn Meshell, Trinity 4-H, 7th; Zachary Davison, Groveton 4-H, 8th; Preston Murray, East County 4-H, 9th; Miley Hannah, Groveton 4-H, 10th; Tanner Smith, Apple Springs FFA, 11th; Clay Ashworth, Centerville FFA, 12th; Olivia Smith, Apple Springs FFA, 13th; Eryn Eaton, Trinity FFA, 14th; Emily Brister, Apple Springs FFA, 15th; Leo Conner, Centerville FFA, 16th.

  • Trinity County Fair kicks off early (VIDEO)

    031721 fair 2TONY FARKAS | TCNS Trey Page tends to his chickens prior to the Broiler Show during the Trinity County Fair and Livestock Sale on Wednesday March 10, 2021.

    By Tony Farkas

    GROVETON — After a year without, the Trinity County Fair & Youth Livestock Show kicked off Wednesday — with just a few changes.

    Instead of a weekend affair, the shows have been spread out over four days to keep in compliance with CDC guidelines, said Fair Board President Bill Wagner.

    On Wednesday, rabbits and chickens were checked in and judged; Thursday will see steers and lambs; Friday will be goats and swine; and Saturday will feature the livestock sale.

    Even so, Wagner said the first day was going fine. In all, there are 146 entries: 15 steers, five lambs, 18 goats, 57 hogs, 11 heifers, 13 broilers and 27 fryers.

    The remaining schedule for the week is:

    Wednesday

    1 p.m. Fryer show

    4:30 p.m. Commercial heifers test and record book turn-in at the Groveton High School Ag Building.

    Thursday

    7:30 a.m. Steer sift

    8-10 a.m. Heifers, lambs and steers check-in.

    11 a.m. Heifer show

    1 p.m. Lamb show

    3 p.m. Steer show

    Friday

    8-10 a.m. Goats, hogs check-in

    2 p.m. Goat show

    5 p.m. Hog show

    Saturday

    5 p.m. Online and live auction

  • Trinity County Fair set to kick off

    FAIRTRINITY COUNTY FAIR LOGO

    Special to the News-Standard

    GROVETON — The Trinity County Fair and Youth Livestock Show is slated for the third week in March in Groveton at the County Fairgrounds.

    It all starts Tuesday, March 16.

    The Fair will be a little different this year because of masking and social distancing requirements; board members decided to spread the show out over more days to eliminate having so many people in the barn at the same time.

    Patrons also are requested to wear masks. Additionally, there will be no pet show this year.

    Despite the changes, there will be a host of animals and student projects to see and a limited concession stand will offer refreshments.

    Students from 4-H and FFA from Apple Springs, Centerville, Groveton, and Trinity schools are expected to compete.

    Awards will be given at the conclusion of each show.

    All buyers are welcome, and add-ons will be accepted.

    There will be an online auction at Wal-Lee Auction Co. Inc. Online bidding starts March 15 at walleeauctioncompany.com.

    For information, call Show Secretary Laura Worsham Anderson at (936) 465-0110 or President Bill Wagner at (713) 501-6733.

    Schedule of Events

    Wednesday, March 17

    Shop projects should be entered between 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. but will be accepted up till 5 p.m. for the sale. Judging will start at 2 p.m.

    8-10 a.m. Fryers and broilers check-in

    11 a.m. Broiler show at

    1 p.m. Fryer show

    Commercial Heifer test and record book due at 4:30 p.m. at the Groveton High School Ag Building

    Thursday, March 18

    7:30 a.m. Steer sift begins

    8-10 a.m. Commercial heifers, lambs, and steers check-in

    11 a.m. Heifer show

    1 p.m. Lamb show

    3 p.m. Steer show

    Friday, March 19

    8-10 a.m. Goats and hogs check-in

    2 p.m. Goat show

    5 p.m. Hog show

    Saturday, March 20

    5 p.m. Online/live auction begins at 5 p.m. starting with shop projects and the animal projects.

    Only the Grand Champion and Reserve Champions will walk at the auction. All projects will be sold.

  • Trinity County gets pushback

    CountysealFILE PHOTO Trinity County seal

    Concern about contract for vehicles results in argument, no action

    By Tony Farkas

    GROVETON — Concerns raised by the Trinity County Treasurer over a contract for Sheriff’s Office vehicles with Enterprise Fleet two weeks ago led to a battle between elected officials on March 23.

    It also led to Sheriff Woody Wallace asserting his sole authority over the Sheriff’s Office, saying he was the only one to decide what vehicles he and his deputies will drive, and that the Commissioners Court’s only responsibilities were to provide vehicle replacements and approve finances.

    He also said the court has been less than supportive in the matter.

    Wallace also cautioned Treasurer Bob Dockens about meddling in areas that are not of his concern, saying that according to the State Constitution, that was a crime.

    “These people in this room, they elected me sheriff,” Wallace said before a packed courtroom. “They did not elect Bob (Dockens) sheriff. It’s my job as sheriff to operate this department.

    “My authority is granted by the constitution as to what I can and cannot do. when one elected official interferes with another elected official he has committed a crime for trying to influence another office. You cannot do it.

    Commissioner Neal Smith said he put the item on the agenda today because questions have been raised over the last month regarding the contract, and that Wallace brought the contract forward because no one could not buy vehicles as the manufacturers had shut down production.

    He also said there is no one on the court more supportive of the department; he said that everything Wallace has asked for he has gotten, and that day’s discussion, and another item to purchase vehicles outright, should indicate that.

    Addressing the meeting, which was moved to the grand courtroom because of the crowd, Dockens said that at a Commissioners Court meeting two weeks ago, he brought up concerns after he was asked by the auditor to take a look at the contract, basically regarding the interest rate being charged and actual vehicle ownership.

    Dockens also said he was told by Wallace at the last meeting that if he could find some vehicles, he should; Wallace interrupted, saying he was being facetious.

    However, Dockens said he talked with several dealers in the area that had vehicles ready to go.

    “All I was doing was exploring if there were other places that had vehicles ready, because if we can buy them then let’s do that,” Dockens said.

    Wallace disputed that account, saying the information he received from the same dealers was the vehicles were 90 days out. He also was adamant about being the only one to run his department; saying the Sheriff decides what the Sheriff’s Department drives.

    Dockens said he only got involved because he was asked to look into it and because his office is in charge of risk management.

    “I have a problem with one man getting you to cancel a contract that we’ve already signed,” Wallace said. “I have a problem with anyone getting involved; this is between me and this court.

    “The commissioners can only tell me what I can spend,” Wallace said. “They cannot tell me what I can or cannot drive. The people of the county deserve officers that operate in safe vehicles that are not worn out or subject to crash. It’s a known fact that in the automotive world that vehicles wear out at 150,000 miles. We operate vehicles at 120 mph every day.”

    County Attorney Colton Hay said he was asked to review the contract by Dockens, and to “get ahead of” some misinformation provided by Dockens, he did the review.

    Hay said he thought the contract was standard and a good deal, and since the contract has been signed, work has been done by Enterprise.

    “If we back out of this contract because Dockens has cold feet, even though he was not in on the contract from the beginning, that could potentially cost us everything they’ve spent without any of the benefits,” Hay said. “I urge you to remember you agreed to it, and nothing’s changed except one person got involved that wasn’t in on it at the beginning and didn’t understand it all because it was not his department.

    “I don’t think this is too good to be true,” Hay said.

    Commissioner Tommy Park, a former law enforcement officer, said he took things upon himself to find answers for the questions the court and treasurer had, and then relayed those answers to everyone concerned.

    Smith said that no action was needed on his agenda item as he withdrew his objections; however, he said that in the future, there will be no votes whatsoever until everything is understood by the court.

  • Trinity County now papers boats

    031821 boatsTONY FARKAS | TCNS Nancy Due Shanafelt, Trinity County tax assessor/collector, goes through paperwork and fee schedules regarding boat registration, which is a service the county will begin providing residents.

    By Tony Farkas

    GROVETON — Trinity County now has the ability to provide titles and registrations for all your boating needs.

    County Tax Assessor/Collector Nancy Due Shanafelt said the county has gotten all necessary approvals and will now register and title boats and motors in the county. Previously, boat owners had to go to Lufkin or elsewhere to have that done.

    “We have our login information, we have our forms printed out, and we even have the people waiting to register their boats,” she said. “But, we’re waiting on the stickers and supplies to be sent here from the state.”

    Shanafelt said registration is required for any boat to be on a Texas waterway. The county will start registrations no later than April 1, but only in Groveton; the Trinity annex will be able to do registrations once the bugs are ironed out.

    “I campaigned on staying open for lunch, which we’re on our second week of that; taking credit cards, which has been a hit; and the third was boat registration,” she said.

    Shanafelt said that this will be the first time the county will provide the service.

    “Anything for the people,” she said. “We can keep them here, and make a little money for the county.”

    Registration fees are based on the length of the craft, varying from $32 for boats 16 feet or smaller, and $53 for craft from 16 to 26 feet; Shanafelt said the $32 fee will be the most common.

    Additional fees include $22 for a replacement sticker, and $27 for a title.

    “I think we have 1,300 boats in Trinity County, and they need to be registered every two years,” she said. “There’s a lot to it, but it’s a great service for the people of the county.”

  • Trinity County Officials take county to task on pay scales

    CountysealFILE PHOTO Trinity County Seal

    By Tony Farkas

    GROVETON — Trinity County Commissioners’ Court on March 23 heard threats of lawsuits regarding decisions on pay raises.

    County Clerk Shasta Bergman told the court that there is a pay disparity between the employees of female elected officials and that of male elected officials, and she, by submitting several requests for raises, was addressing the problem.

    Of the four requests that were submitted, three were for Bergman’s employees; one for an additional $2.78 on a salary of $10.92 per hour, one for an additional $3.22 on the chief deputy’s salary of $11.20 per hour, and the last for an additional $1 on a salary of $10.50 per hour.

    Bergman told the funds for the raises would be taken from her department’s Records Management account, and not from the general fund, which would not affect county income or tax dollars because the funds came from fees charged for record-keeping.

    She also said those funds can only be used in her office, and mostly for salaries.

    However, Commissioner Mike Loftin said during the budget season last year that the court decided there would be no raises, as the county needed to be frugal, despite being told by Bergman that the raises will not affect the county budget.

    Commissioner Neal Smith said that the county attempted to look at all departments equally, and had the pay scales within pennies of each other.

    “You can’t starve people out of a job,” Bergman said. “You are setting yourself up for trouble.”

    Sheriff Woody Wallace said the county needed to be mindful of the legal ramifications of its decisions, saying also that he was “sick and tired” of his deputies having to work second jobs to feed their children.

    “We need to look at this before we find ourselves in a class action lawsuit,” he said.

    Loftin insisted that he understands the plight of the employees, but said the idea was to wait until this year’s budget season to determine what money was available; Bergman again said that the funds came from a different source than tax dollars.

    Commissioner Steven Truss said that if the court approved the raises, then all departments will be seeking raises.

    Commissioner Tommy Park made the motion to approve the raises, which had to be seconded by County Judge Doug Page. The end result, though, was that Smith, Loftin and Truss voted against the raises.

    Bergman told commissioners then that she will present the raises in the same manner until they are approved, or they are handled through legal means.

    In other business, the county:

    • approved the appointment of Stacye Tullos as Trinity County Extension Agent-Ag and Natural Resources;
    • proclaimed the month of April as Child Abuse Prevention Month;
    • discussed billing from Groveton EMS regarding visits to inmates; and
    • recognized the county’s constables for taking training regarding the state Open Meetings and Public Information acts.
  • Trinity County reverses stand

    042221 countyTONY FARKAS | TCNS County Judge Doug Page is surrounded by SAAFE House members Rana Wingo, Tracy Szymczak and Renee Murphy as the Trinity County Commissioners’ Court proclaimed April as Sexual Assault Awareness Month on April 23.

    By Tony Farkas

    GROVETON — With the exception of one commissioner, the Trinity County Commissioners’ Court approved personnel changes — including pay raises — at its Tuesday meeting.

    After a raucous meeting on March 23, the commission denied approval of any personnel action forms because they contained pay raises.

    Commissioner Mike Loftin said at the time that during the budget season last year, the court decided there would be no raises, as the county needed to be frugal.

    At the April 13 meeting, Loftin questioned the source of the raises, noting that none will increase the bottom line of department budgets.

    “As long as the budget’s not changing, it is OK,” Loftin said. “We face something we’ve never faced because of COVID — people lost their jobs — and that was the concern that I had. We didn’t know how much tax revenue we would be gaining, and we didn’t need to be eating up our savings.”

    He also said he found out that tax collections are very close to last year’s levels.

    Commissioner Neal Smith said that now is not the time to be giving raises.

    “Since I’ve been on the court, we’ve given raises ever year except last year,” he said. “Now, we’re jumping around and giving this one a little, and that one a little, and that’s not fair, and every month they’re coming in for more and more.”

    Smith said the requests will start coming in from all departments requesting raises, and while he is not against paying employees more, he is against approving raises at this time.

    Commissioner Tommy Park made the motion to approve, which was seconded by Loftin. Smith was the only commissioner voting against the measure.

    Commissioner Steven Truss said that regardless of the outcome of the vote, there needed to be some organization regarding pay raises across the board, suggesting there be a scale instituted, much like there is at the state level.

    Smith agreed, saying that he is aware that some starting employees are hired making more that people who have been with the county for 30 years or more, and that pay needs to be fair.

    “I’m not against people making more money, but we need to be equal about this,” he said.

    The court agreed, and approved the payment of $5,000 for an outside firm to conduct an employee compensation study, which will also provide suggestions for a scale as well as determine how employees’ salaries stack up to state averages.

    In other business, the county:

    • proclaimed April as Sexual Assault Awareness Month in Trinity County;
    • proclaimed April as Fair Housing Month;
    • approved a budget amendment moving funds into vehicle maintenance after the city received insurance money to fix the wrecked Sheriff’s Department vehicle;
    • approved a measure allowing the county to hire for a cleanup of phone and IT cables and the addition of three wifi access points in the County Annex;
    • approved closing a bank account the county no longer used;
    • approved hiring a part-time clerk to hand filing and processing of notices for nuisance abatements;
    • approved the purchase of several used vehicles from the Texas Forest Service;
    • approved a road use agreement for Precinct 1; and
    • approved a replat of lots on Merrywood Drive
  • Trinity County student headed to state track

    050621 kayla mott 3COURTESY PHOTO Centerville Bulldog runner Kayla Mott will be running the 100-meter hurdles at Mike Myers stadium in Austin on May 8 after she qualified at regionals with a second-place finish and a time of 16.82. Kayla also placed fourth in the 300 meter with a time of 52.95 at the regional track meet.

    TCNS staff

    Of the four schools in Trinity County, Centerville has the only athlete that will travel to the state meet this weekend in Austin.

    Groveton had plenty of athletes participate, but none made the cut for the state invite.

    However, plenty of athletes from all schools set personal and season records for themselves.

    Trinity

    Region 3 3A track meet

    April 23-27

    Girls

    Pole vault

    Fifth, Shelby Walters, 9-00 (personal record)

    High Jump

    11th, Shaniya English, 4-08 (season record)

    Groveton

    Region 3 2A track meet

    April 24-26

    Palestine

    Boys

    800 meters

    Ninth, Hayden Lee, 2:13.40, (personal record)

    1600 meters

    15th, Jarrett Loftin, 5:25.05, (personal record)

    3200 meters

    Ninth, Jarrett Loftin, 11:39.12, (personal record)

    300-meter hurdles

    Ninth, 12 King Jones, 43.47, (personal record)

    4x400-meter relay

    16th, David Ayala, Navid Pat, Chase Blair, Hayden Lee, 3:55.71

    Shot put

    Sixth, Tyler Allen, 42-03 (personal record)

    High jump

    Fifth, Malachi Stewart, 6-00 (personal record)

    Pole vault

    10th (tie), Hayden Lee, 10-00 (season record); Daiton Chandler, 10-00 (personal record)

    Girls

    1600 meters

    Eighth, Caitlyn Antley, 6:09.28 (season record)

    4x100 relay

    Seventh, Kaylee McCrory, Maicey Smith, Emma Alexander, Breanna McQueen, 52.46,

    4x200 relay

    Fourth, Kaylee McCrory, Maicey Smith, Emma Alexander, Breanna McQueen, 1:50.34

    Shot put

    Eighth, Canaan Dillard, 31-05 (personal record)

    Discus

    11th, Stacy Rojo, 84-01 (personal record)

    Long jump

    14th, Breanna McQueen, 14-05 (personal record)

    Apple Springs

    Region 4 1A track meet

    April 23-27

    League City

    Boys

    Long Jump

    14th, Sydney Williams, 12-08 (personal record)

    Centerville

    Region 4 1A track meet

    April 23-27

    League City

    Girls

    100-meter hurdles

    Second, Kayla Mott, 16.82, (personal record)

    300-meter hurdles

    Fourth, Kayla Mott, 52.95, (personal record)

  • Trinity County's New Attorney looks to implement change (VIDEO)

    011421 colton hayTONY FARKAS | TCNS Colton Hay took the reins of the Trinity County Attorney’s office on January 4, 2021, hitting the ground running.

    By Tony Farkas

    GROVETON — Colton Hay walked into the office at 8 a.m. on the first day to a ringing telephone and only him to answer it.

    The newly minted County Attorney, elected in November to replace Joe Warner Bell, was being asked about creating a protective order. Hay said he had to call around that morning to find out what the protocol and procedures were.

    “I started calling around, and Rana Wingo of the SAAFE House was able to help me out, and what I found reaching out to people is that no one really knew exactly what to do, where a protective order was supposed to start,” he said.

    Hay went immediately to work, setting up meetings with Wingo, the Sheriff’s Office and the DA’s office, as well as other entities involved, and together created a step-by-step process — that was on the second day.

    “That’s what I’m looking to do — update things, trying new things, something you can only do when you’re new and don’t really know exactly what to do,” Hay said. “(The new procedure) will be great for the victims, for everyone, and I don’t want to stop there, with protective orders and criminal cases, I want to keep going and bring that new insight to the office.”

    The word update sums up Hay’s entire campaign.

    “We’re looking to get new computers, and we, with the DA and the Sheriff, are looking into software that will connect all of us, to expedite things,” he said. “I want to get everyone communicating.”

    Hay said he hopes to bring some youthful energy to the position. Having just got married, he said he wants to put down roots, and saw the election as a good opportunity to do that.

    Hay graduated law school in 2017, and worked for an insurance defense firm for the nephew of Joe Ned Dean, who gave him some sage advice.

    Hay also is a former clerk for the Trinity County District Attorney Bennie Schiro, and has worked in Anderson County for two years doing the essentially the same work as he is doing now. He said he brings experience and a fresh perspective to the position.

  • Trinity downs Woodville (VIDEO)

    IMG 3711TONY FARKAS | TCNS Trinity’s Jakai Miller-Gates (No. 13) goes up for two of his 18 points during a Dec. 4 match with Woodville. The Tigers won the game 62-59.

    TCNS staff

    TRINITY — Practice made for almost perfect as the Trinity Tigers downed the Woodville Eagles 62-59 on Friday.

    Head Coach Jacoby Mitchell credited gym time for the improvement over their opening game.

    “I felt like we been in the gym a lot more, and they were realizing what is a good shot and a great shot, and had less problems with turnovers,” Mitchell said.

    Top scorers in the match include Terius Maxie, who posted 20 points as well as banking the double-double, pulling down 12 rebounds; Jakai Miller-Gates with 18 points; and Trey Goodman with 13 points.

    Trinity VS. Woodvillle Video

    Boys Basketball

    Trinity

    Dec. 1 vs. Grapeland, 66-56 loss.

    Nov. 23 vs. Huntington, 51-44 loss.

    Groveton

    Nov. 24 vs. Corrigan-Camden, 34-30 win.

    Apple Springs

    Dec. 4 vs. Richards, 54-40 loss.

    Dec. 1 vs. Zavala, 54-21 loss.

    Nov. 23 vs. Brookeland, 55-27 loss.

    Centerville

    No scores reported

    Girls Basketball

    Trinity

    Dec. 5 vs. Centerville, 53-31 loss.

    Dec. 4 vs. Corrigan-Camden, 56-22 win.

    Nov. 23 vs. Livingston, 49-32 win.

    Groveton

    Dec. 4 vs. Caney Creek, 35-32 win

    Apple Springs

    Dec. 1 vs. Zavala, 46-33 loss.

    Nov. 23 vs. Brookeland, 25-22 loss.

    Centerville

    No scores reported.