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Council hears fowl presentation

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061622 city hears fowl presentationThe current ordinance requires fowl to be kept at least 200 feet from a residence or dwelling house.

By Chris Edwards
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WOODVILLE – At its regular monthly meeting on Monday, the Woodville City Council heard a presentation from Rusty Kuciemba about possibly amending an ordinance.

The ordinance Kuciemba spoke of pertains to the keeping of livestock or fowl within the city limits. Kuciemba asked Mayor Paula Jones and the council to amend the ordinance to include backyard chickens within 50 feet of a residence. At present, the ordinance requires fowl to be kept at least 200 feet from a residence or dwelling house.

Kuciemba spoke about a recent pair of bills filed in the state House and Senate that allow for the keeping of livestock and fowl within the city limits of an incorporated municipality. At present, according to statute, it is unlawful for livestock and fowl to be kept less than 200 feet from a residence. The proposed amendment called for chicken, turkeys, geese, guineas, ducks, pigeons or similar animals, to be kept a minimum of 50 feet from a dwelling structure.

Several other cities, including San Antonio, Dallas, Austin, Fort Worth and Livingston, all make allowances for fowl to be kept a minimum 50-foot distance. Kuciemba said that many, or most, residents of Woodville do not have backyards big enough to fall within the current ordinance requirement for fowl.

Kuciemba said that within the proposal, there would be a prohibition on roosters, but that with allowing chickens in backyards, there are several benefits, including fresh yard eggs, which he said are healthier than store-bought eggs.

Council agreed to look into the matter and consider the amendment to the ordinance.

In other business on Monday evening’s agenda, City Administrator Mandy Risinger apprised councilmembers and the mayor of a proposed increased of the city’s health department fees.

The annual fee increase would be for 20-25%. Risinger said that there had been no increase in the department’s fees since at least 2017.
Council voted to table the item pending a closer examination.

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COVID numbers reported

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061622 covid numbers reported

By Chris Edwards
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TYLER COUNTY – For the first time since February, the county’s emergency management office is reporting COVID numbers.

“We have gone over 25 active cases in the county,” said Ken Jobe, the county’s Emergency Management Coordinator. Jobe reported, on Tuesday, that the number of active cases in the county are at 49, as of June 8.

The numbers in Tyler County mirror a statewide trend that show a rise over the past month. Jobe said he will report the numbers to the public, including posts to the county’s OEM on its Facebook page, until the numbers drop below 25.

Since the reportage began with the first confirmed case in the county in late March of 2020, there have been a total of 3,703 confirmed cases, with 3,566 of them recovered and 88 deaths from COVID-related causes.

According to statewide reporting, from the state’s Department of State Health Services, there were 47,582 new cases of the virus reported during the past week, which was virtually unchanged from the previous week.

Hospitalizations have been up 27% according to the DSHS numbers.

The slight uptick in COVID cases has been consistent across the country, since May, which experts have attributed to two new subvariants of the virus, BA.2 and BA.2.12.1.

Those two variants, according to DSHS data, represented 61.8% and 32.4% of all cases in early May. The variants are related to the earlier COVID strain omicron, but according to experts, are not as virulent and less deadly.

Carrie Kroll, of the Texas Hospital Association, stated in a news release that hospitals are now better prepared to deal with the current wave of COVID variants, and that treatments such as monoclonal antibodies as well as antiviral pills have assisted in healthcare providers being betterprepared.

Kroll said, however, that hospitals across the state are still facing a shortage of nurses and respiratory therapists.

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Tyler County Art League

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061622 art league winnerThe Tyler County Art League judge selected Amy Teague’s entry as the Big Woods Nature Trail Photo-of-the-Month for May. She used a Nikon 7100 to take the photo. Amy and her husband Norman live in Colmesneil and are volunteers in the East Texas Train Museum housed in the Hamm House at the Big Woods trailhead. All guests walking the Big Woods Nature Trail are encouraged to read the contest procedures posted on the kiosk and submit a photo.

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Diploma awarded

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060922 diploma awardedIn 1968, Charley Wallet enlisted in the U.S. Army, before he was set to graduate in 1969. On May 27, 2022, Warren High School honored Wallet with a high school diploma.

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Local author announces book

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060922 local author releaseWOODVILLE — Local author Michael G. Maness and Kevaughn Mattis, from Trinidad, are pleased to present their new book, Can Your Hear My Pain NoNow? —king Pastoral Theology Relevant in a Modern World, from the scholarly press Wipf & Stock.

The 24 articles address the hurting person. Pathfinders give new light from their specialties, uniquely, and artfully from decades of experience, including how the secular disciplines merge with biblical pastoral care. Conflict and violence, issues of overbearing judgmental attitudes, Roman Catholic compassion complement articles on addiction, healthy relationships, sexual abuse, and repression in Africa and beyond. Ethics and the problem of suffering work side by side with a profound theology of disability. Pastoral care and its theology get a gentle boost from some of the best in the business of caring for the soul.

Baylor Professor Gerald R. McDermott noted, “In this dark world where many are alienated and without God and hope, pastoral theology offers both God and hope…. This book will help provide the healing which this world and Church so desperately need. May the Triune God use this volume to help pastors ministering to God’s sheep.”

Dr. Amos Yong’s article on disability forwards the amazingly helpful term, “temporarily able-bodied.” Greek Orthodox Dr. Vasileios Thermos and Roman Catholic Dr. Robert Fastiggi enlighten next to the powerful testaments of Professor Godfrey Harold on South Africa and Dr. Samuel Yonas Deressa on Ethiopia. Each weathered author contributes universal insights into the grace of our great God and challenges pastors throughout the Christian world to kindly consider the heart of the afflicted. These finely hewn stones can be used by anyone in the ministry to sharpen their serve.

In many ways, all the authors have given their lives to pastoral care theology. From Greece to Detroit; Canada; Limuru, Kenya; Riverdale, Georgia; South Africa; Marburg, Germany; Pasadena, California; Gboko, Nigeria—and more—herein experts from all over the world represent hundreds of years of pastoral care for the soul.

Mattis and Maness offer this third collection, following their previous book, Practicality of Grace in Protestant Theology (2021), from the hundreds of articles they have had the honor to publish in their online journal Testamentum Imperium. They pray these articles will open new avenues of sensitivity to the hearts and souls of those in travail and aid those who are called by God to serve those in pain. See more at PreciousHeart.net/ti.

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