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Tyler County News - Breakout

Fans exhibit at Allan Shivers

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Part of the large exhibit of fans comes from the collections of Timme, Museum Director Roschelle Springfield and from the late Marialice Shivers.  CHRIS EDWARDS | TCBPart of the large exhibit of fans comes from the collections of Timme, Museum Director Roschelle Springfield and from the late Marialice Shivers. CHRIS EDWARDS | TCB

Special to the Booster

WOODVILLE – This has been a dreadfully hot and dry summer in Tyler County.  One way of helping relieve the misery of heat is to use a hand fan.

Did you know that hand fans originated over 4,000 years ago?  Hand fans were even found in King Tut’s tomb.  So what do hand fans have to do with the Allan Shivers Museum?  Marialice Shivers was very fond of hand fans and is shown in several portraits with a fan as an accessory.  The ALSM will be featuring a variety of “Pop-Up” exhibits displayed in the Exhibit Hall of the museum throughout the year. Hand fans are the first of

more to come.

Several of Mrs. Shivers fans will be on display as well as many other vintage fans that will tell the history of hand fans with a display of the three basic types of hand fans, the bris, the cockade, and the rigid shape.  Come learn more about fans from the exhibit that opened on Tuesday, Sept. 12, and will run through Oct. 21.

The special ticket price to tour only the Pop-Up exhibits will be $1.00 and can be purchased at the library check out desk. However, the price of the Pop-Up exhibit is included in the regular ticket price for a full museum tour.

The museum is open 10 a.m. –3 p.m., Tuesday – Friday and 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. on Saturday.

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Colmesneil council approves bids for Pitzer project

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CityofColmenseilBy Mollie LaSalle
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COLMESNEIL – Colmesneil City Council held their regular meeting last Tuesday, September 12.

All council members were present, and all agenda items were addressed in short order.

The first item was to consider and approve going out for bids on the CDV21-0272 TDA CDBG Project. Lead Engineering is the contractor for this, which will be for North Pitzer street/bridge.  Lesley Waxman’s office is assisting in this endeavor, and she will be at the next council meeting to give updates. Council went ahead and approved this item.

Council then approved Ordinance # 127, the cancellation of the general election for November 7, 2023, due to no opposition (for any council seats). Council quickly approved the financial and investment reports, the office report, and finally, the water and sewer reports.

The third annual Fall Festival is scheduled for Oct. 28 from 6-8 p.m., at the community center parking lot. This year promises to be bigger and better than ever. It is hosted by Colmesneil City Hall, and many other local businesses, churches, and organizations. Everyone is encouraged to wear a costume (adults, this means you, too).

Council approved all previous month’s reports in short order and heard a complaint about loose dogs roaming around at the post office from Catherine Deason, who wanted to know if anything could be done about the situation; council took this under advisement, and no solutions were agreed upon.

With no further business to discuss, council adjourned for the evening. Colmesneil City Council meets the second Tuesday of the month at 6 p.m.

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TEA ratings, chaplains discussed by WISD board

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Woodville ISD was presented with a $613,836 grant from Texas Workforce Solutions toward its CTE program. Pictured accepting the check are, left-to-right: WISD Superintendent Lisa Meysembourg; WISD board of trustees member Richard “Kooter” Shaw; Woodville High School Principal Lara Robinson; trustee Kris Fowler; trustee Bryan Shirley; WISD Board President Jimmy Tucker and trustee John David Risinger. CHRIS EDWARDS | TCBWoodville ISD was presented with a $613,836 grant from Texas Workforce Solutions toward its CTE program. Pictured accepting the check are, left-to-right: WISD Superintendent Lisa Meysembourg; WISD board of trustees member Richard “Kooter” Shaw; Woodville High School Principal Lara Robinson; trustee Kris Fowler; trustee Bryan Shirley; WISD Board President Jimmy Tucker and trustee John David Risinger. CHRIS EDWARDS | TCB

By Chris Edwards
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WOODVILLE – Woodville ISD Superintendent Lisa Meysembourg shared an update on the already delayed district accountability ratings to the district’s board of trustees on Monday night at the board’s regular meeting.

Meysembourg said that the ratings were originally to be released by the Texas Education Agency (TEA) on Sept. 26 to school districts across the state and two days after to the public. The rankings are delayed until sometime in late October, Meysembourg said.

The reason for the delay, Meysembourg said, has to do with skewed data due to COVID, and its impact upon student performance.

“Bottom line is regardless of whatever the rating says, which is one measurement based on one day of assessments, at Woodville ISD we pride ourselves on making sure our students are educated and prepared for life after high school, regardless of what those scores say,” Meysembourg said.

The agency’s A-F accountability rating system is being “refreshed” this year, according to a TEA news release, with changes made to cut points and indices.

Regarding the skewed data, TEA issued the following statement: “since that time, statewide growth data for the 2022–23 school year has become available. Analysis of that growth data shows that the 2021–22 growth was more anomalous than expected, so setting baselines that partially incorporate data from the 2021–22 school year may not adequately take into account the impact of COVID-19. “

The retooling of the accountability system has been controversial, and several districts, mostly located in central Texas, have filed lawsuits against TEA citing a lack of transparency as to the changes to the system.

SB 763 discussed

During her report to the board, Meysembourg provided some information on a controversial senate bill that allows school districts to utilize chaplains as counselors.

Senate Bill 763, which was passed in the regular session of the 88th Legislature, allows for schools to use safety funds to pay for chaplains to work in counselor/mental health roles. It also allows for volunteer chaplains to be allowed in schools.

According to the text of the bill, any school district, or open-enrollment charter school, may employ, or accept a volunteer, chaplain to provide support, services and programs for students as assigned by the board of trustees, or whatever the school’s governing body comprises. The chaplain, under this law, is not required to be certified under the State Board for Educator Certification.

The bill has proven controversial, as critics have seen it as a sort of Trojan Horse to evangelize to public school students.

Meysembourg said that under the law, the board will have to pass a resolution to decide whether or not to utilize chaplains in the district under SB 763’s parameters.

She said if the district wishes to continue to use chaplains in crisis counseling that “we would have to be very clear in a resolution that would approve them as chaplains, however, it would be hard to develop parameters for volunteer work and scope of service while prohibiting proselytizing or engaging in faith-based messaging.”

Meysembourg said it would be hard for volunteer chaplains in a crisis situation to separate their faith from the counseling they would be doing, as many are not trained in counseling, outside of faith-based programs.

WISD board president Jimmy Tucker recommended that all board members study the bill closely and to “dig in real deep” to see what all is in the bill.

Meysembourg said WISD will continue to follow the developments with the new law and will probably bring it back before the board in January.

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NEW QUEEN IN WARRIOR COUNTRY

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Hannah Bryant WHC

Hannah Bryant, a Warren High School senior, was crowned the 2023 Warren HS Homecoming Queen last Friday. She currently serves as a drum major for the Pride of Warren Marching Band; Captain of the WHS Warriorettes Drill Team, is a member of the WHS FFA, and plans to go into real estate after high school.  The Warriors won their homecoming game against the Huntington Red Devils, defeating them 12-6.COURTESY PHOTO

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Rotary Foundation explained at meeting

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Fred Sullivan explains what the Rotary Foundation does at the Wednesday meeting of the Rotary Club of Woodville. MOLLIE LASALLE | TCBFred Sullivan explains what the Rotary Foundation does at the Wednesday meeting of the Rotary Club of Woodville. MOLLIE LASALLE | TCB

By Mollie LaSalle
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WOODVILLE – Fred Sullivan brought an inciteful and informative program at last Wednesday’s meeting of the Rotary Club of Woodville at the Pickett House.

He spoke about the history of the Rotary Foundation, and its long history of doing good in the world. “It began in 1917, over one hundred years ago. The Rotary International president at the time had an idea for an endowment fund; the initial contribution was $26.50, which was a good sum of money in 1917. This was left over profits from the Rotary International Convention that year, so it was donated to the endowment fund to start the Rotary Foundation. In the past 106 years, the Foundation has spent over 3.7 billion dollars doing good in the world”, Sullivan added.

The Rotary Foundation has a four- star rating from charities navigator, as more than 91% of the monies received go into projects. Fifty cents of every dollar donated to the Rotary Foundation in District 5910 (Woodville’s district) comes back to the district in three years and made available to clubs for grants. Rotary Club of Woodville has received grants in the past. The Tyler County Hospital Pavilion, the “Don’t Meth with Me” program, and Hennigan Softball Park have been the benefactors of these grants in past years.

Contributions to the Rotary Foundation basically go to the annual fund, which is made up of the world fund, and the district designated fund (DDF). Additionally, for many years, Rotary has been making a contribution to Polio Plus, and since its inception, this program has reduced the number of polio cases by 99.99% world-wide, with 2.5 million children being vaccinated.

The Rotary Foundation focuses on six areas of need around the globe: Water, Sanitation and Hygiene, Maternal and Child Health, Basic Education and Literacy, Peace Building and Conflict Resolution, Disease Prevention and Treatment, and Community Economic Development. The Rotary Foundation is considered the number one charity as far as monies given for services; if you’re giving to the Rotary Foundation, your money is going to do good in the world.

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