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Luke (rt) and his good friend Larry Weishuhn are both in their mid seventies and still enjoying the great outdoors, maybe more now than ever! Photo by Luke Clayton
April 16, 2024

OLDER SPORTSMEN HAVE MORE FUN

Category: Outdoor Life Author: Super User
Luke (rt) and his good friend Larry Weishuhn are both in their mid seventies and still enjoying the great outdoors, maybe more now than ever! Photo by Luke ClaytonThere was a time back when I was in my twenties and thirties that I thought I would be hanging…
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April 13, 2024

Close-to-home fun

Category: Outdoor Life Author: Super User
As an outdoors writer for the past 39 years, I’ve become accustomed to “gallavanting” around the country fishing, hunting and collecting material for my articles. Lately though, I’ve been sticking pretty close to home. Kenneth Shephard with a good “eater…

Polk County News - Breakout

LISD to secure plans for athletic facilities

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Livingston ISD LogoFrom Enterprise Staff

During a special meeting of the Livingston ISD school board, Superintendent Dr. Brent Hawkins presented a report on the capital facilities plan for the district. Included in the report was the facilities’ age and life cycle.

“In the current budget we’ll roll $1.8 million into the fund balance because they are ESSER funds that were supplanted in the fund balance to be used at a later date for staff salaries,” Hawkins said. “The facility committee has reviewed our fund balance. We are a Chapter 42 district, and there is not a Chapter 42 district that has had the financial success that we have had in the last 10 years. I’m very proud of this accomplishment.”

Hawkins said the district’s current fund balance is at $28 million, compared to a $12 million balance in 2014. The Texas Education Agency recommends that three months operating expenses remain in the fund balance. He said the district has been focused, disciplined, and good stewards of the tax dollars. There are also assigned monies available for improving facilities.

“Raise Your Hand Texas is a public advocacy group set up by H.E. Butts, and they researched the 2019-2022 school years,” Hawkins said. “LISD receives a basic allotment for every student who attends the district. The state is prepared to increase the basic allotment of $100 per student. Fifty percent of the increase in basic allotment will go to employee salaries. With this increase, it would only allow about a 1% cost of living raise, which doesn’t cut it. There is a 6% increase in inflation over a two-year period in fuel, insurance, construction costs, and operating expenses — and significant, substantial increases in electricity costs. We need a $1,000 per student basic allotment to keep up with the past two years of inflation.

“Our state officials are focused on vouchers to be used in private education, instead of helping all students across the state by increasing the funding in public schools. By neglecting the impact that inflation has on our Texas school districts, they are forcing districts to cut costs. This could result in cutting programs or raising student-teacher ratios because there’s not a lot of fluff in any school budget when you’re looking at 80% staffing costs, which is found in every school district. The legislators have $30 billion that they could use to help public schools. We’ve been through tough times before in the state of Texas, and we have to balance the budget while meeting the needs of the district. I’m just not sure we have seen the state with money and allow districts to go through tough times.” 

The superintendent said he would look to the board for direction and vision on the district facilities plan.

“We have to have a vision for the next 10 to 20 years, and we need a plan. We have started a project at the high school. I’ve been asked numerous times how much it will cost to finish the project. The field at Lions Stadium is starting to need work. The facility committee asked me to have the engineers and architects review Lions Stadium. They looked at the stands, field, and the scoreboard. We don’t need to be spending money on the facility when we don’t know what the longevity is. In the master plan, we would like the completion of the high school stadium, and the current Lions Stadium could be reclaimed for safer, more efficient parent pickup for Cedar Grove students. Eventually, our district is going to grow, and this would allow expansion room.”

Hawkins said he could secure estimations on the projects. He feels parking at the high school would be the most expensive part of the project. In the facility committee, there was a discussion about using the fund balance versus a bond.

“If you’re looking to pay for this one piece at a time, it takes longer to accomplish,” Hawkins said. “If you’re looking to do it sooner, there’s no way to do it without a bond successfully passing. Sports bonds are not very high in the probability that they will pass. This is the trend across the state. You need to be able to have a committee to advocate for the bond. With our recent billion-dollar value increase in our county, it would be an uphill battle for the success of a bond, even though the football stadium was built in 1937. All school bonds payoff in 2038. I predict that the dynamics of Interstate 69 will increase the growth of this community, and the district may find that an additional school will be the district’s great need, and you will have to go out for a bond for the construction at that time.” 


Remedial action will be required on the football field before the 2023 football season begins. The board agreed to move forward in securing an architectural plan in transforming the Cochran Complex (soccer/track facility at the high school) in phases and to prepare a construction timeline to finish it out to also use as a football stadium.

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Two LISD students arrested

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043023 students arrested

From Enterprise Staff

Two Livingston ISD students were arrested Thursday in two unrelated incidents. A 14-year-old at the high school was arrested and charged with false alarm or report. A 13-year-old at the junior high school was arrested and charged with assault.

“We had a student arrested after school hours yesterday,” a district representative wrote in an email that was sent to parents Friday morning. “While this morning there is no known threat toward our campus(es), it is important that we all work together to remind our students that threatening words and/or statements are taken seriously. Threatening words create a disruption to operations and are counterproductive to our mission of safety, both physically and emotionally, of all involved.

“Unfortunately, during the course of finalizing the documentation of the arrest made after school yesterday, we had an additional arrest of a student that made a threat in the presence of law enforcement at the junior high campus. This student was immediately removed from campus by law enforcement. We take all matters of safety seriously and act as expeditiously as possible to ensure control of the situation. We strive to provide clear and timely communication to parents and staff while abiding by confidentiality afforded by the law,” a second email to parents said.

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Precinct 1 CLEANUP DAY

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PrecinctCleanupDay

The Polk County Precinct 1 cleanup day was a success, with citizens filling several large dumpsters in the effort. The dumpsters were placed at four different sites on Saturday within the precinct. Courtesy photos

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PROCLAMATION ISSUED

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The Polk County Commissioners Court issued a proclamation recognizing Soil and Water Stewardship Conservation Week during its regular meeting Tuesday. Accepting the proclamation were members of the Polk-San Jacinto Soil and Water Conservation District. (l-r) Precinct 1 Commissioner Guylene Robertson, Precinct 2 Commissioner Mark Dubose, Wright Baker, Patricia Snook, Sandy Baker, County Judge Sydney Murphy, Precinct 4 Commissioner Jerry Cassity and Precinct 3 Commissioner Milt Purvis. Photo by Emily Banks WootenThe Polk County Commissioners Court issued a proclamation recognizing Soil and Water Stewardship Conservation Week during its regular meeting Tuesday. Accepting the proclamation were members of the Polk-San Jacinto Soil and Water Conservation District. (l-r) Precinct 1 Commissioner Guylene Robertson, Precinct 2 Commissioner Mark Dubose, Wright Baker, Patricia Snook, Sandy Baker, County Judge Sydney Murphy, Precinct 4 Commissioner Jerry Cassity and Precinct 3 Commissioner Milt Purvis. Photo by Emily Banks Wooten

The Polk County Commissioners Court issued a proclamation recognizing Soil and Water Stewardship Conservation Week during its regular meeting Tuesday. Accepting the proclamation were members of the Polk-San Jacinto Soil and Water Conservation District. (l-r) Precinct 1 Commissioner Guylene Robertson, Precinct 2 Commissioner Mark Dubose, Wright Baker, Patricia Snook, Sandy Baker, County Judge Sydney Murphy, Precinct 4 Commissioner Jerry Cassity and Precinct 3 Commissioner Milt Purvis. Photo by Emily Banks Wooten

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Free shooting, safety classes event for youth Saturday

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STOCK PHOTOSTOCK PHOTO

Local union volunteers trained in firearms safety and instruction will provide hands-on introductions to sporting clays and archery, and youth will also get some hands-on fishing experience. The event at One in One Hundred Gun Club in Lumberton at 1228 Texas 421 will be Saturday 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m. It is part of a series of free, community-based youth outreach activities organized under Work Boots
on the Ground—the USA’s flagship conservation program. The event is open to the public.

Preserving our outdoor heritage for tomorrow starts with getting kids outside today. Hunters and recreational shooters generate billions in retail sales and economic activity each year, while contributing millions for conservation and wildlife management nationwide through special federal excise taxes.

Research has also proven that outdoor-related activities such as hunting create participatory pathways for children to experience nature and help kindle a lifelong interest in environmental conservation.

This free event will help
educate a future generation of American hunters, recreational shooters, and anglers from diverse communities and backgrounds.

Local labor union members and other volunteers will teach boys and girls from all walks of life about the shooting sports and other outdoor topics.

For more information, contact USA Conservation Coordinator Cody Campbell at 615-928-2243 or by email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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