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QUICK DELAY FOR CHICK-FIL-A ON OPENING DAY

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After a long-awaited opening, the popular restaurant franchise Chick-fil-A began serving customers Thursday.After a long-awaited opening, the popular restaurant franchise Chick-fil-A began serving customers Thursday.

 

Customers not chicken of the wait in line

After a long-awaited opening, the popular restaurant franchise Chick-fil-A began serving customers Thursday.

The response from Polk County was strong, as the drive-thru line flowed out onto Highway 190 and back to Discount Tire.

“We are super excited about it and have been looking forward for a long time to be here in Livingston,” restaurant operator Justin Belcher said. “Just to see some of the familiar faces and be here and bringing the brand of Chick-fil-A to Livingston is what we have been looking forward to. It has been exciting.”

The Livingston Police Department had officers stationed at the restaurant and on Highway 190 to keep the flow of traffic moving. They would also have a presence in the area Friday.

“Chick-fil-A is always looking for an opportunity to serve markets and cities and towns as much as possible,” Belcher said. “I'm not involved in that decision, I'm just very thankful that we landed here. They knew it would be a great opportunity to bring the brand to Livingston.” 

A Houston native, Justin Belcher grew up vacationing in Livingston and has fond memories of visiting Lake Livingston with his family. As the local operator of Chick-fil-A Livingston, Belcher is looking forward to building meaningful relationships and making a positive impact on his community.

Belcher is responsible for all day-to-day activities of the business, including employing approximately 120 full- and part-time team members, cultivating relationships with local organizations and neighboring businesses, and serving guests.      

Chick-fil-A Livingston is located at 1821 U.S. Highway 190, near the intersection of U.S. Highway 190 and U.S. Highway 59, and will be open from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m., Monday
through Saturday.

To limit contact between team members and guests, Chick-fil-A Livingston will open for drive-thru, carry-out and limited dine-in. Guests can take advantage of contactless ordering and payment through the free Chick-fil-A mobile app<https://www.chick-fil-a.com/appdownload> or through online ordering<https://order.chick-fil-a.com/location>. 

In place of the traditional Chick-fil-A First 100® Grand Opening celebration, the Livingston restaurant will surprise 100 local heroes making an impact in Livingston with free Chick-fil-A for a year. Additionally, in honor of the new restaurant opening, Chick-fil-A will donate $25,000 to Feeding America. The funds will be distributed to partners within the greater Houston area to aid in the fight against hunger.

Atlanta-based Chick-fil-A, Inc. is a family owned and privately held restaurant company founded in 1967 by S. Truett Cathy. Devoted to serving the local communities in which its franchised restaurants operate, and known for its original chicken sandwich, Chick-fil-A serves freshly prepared food in more than 2,600 restaurants in 47 states, Washington, D.C., and Canada.

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Polk County duo to represent state

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Zane Lattner and Emma Ivie, both of Polk County, participated in the recent Texas Junior High State Rodeo finals. Zane and Emma are both members of the Region 5 junior high rodeo team. Zane participated in tie down calf roping and the ribbon roping with his partner Steely Rae Franklin. Zane Lattner and Emma Ivie, both of Polk County, participated in the recent Texas Junior High State Rodeo finals. Zane and Emma are both members of the Region 5 junior high rodeo team. Zane participated in tie down calf roping and the ribbon roping with his partner Steely Rae Franklin.

 

Staff Reports

Zane Lattner and Emma Ivie, both of Polk County, participated in the recent Texas Junior High State Rodeo finals. Zane and Emma are both members of the Region 5 junior high rodeo team. Zane participated in tie down calf roping and the ribbon roping with his partner Steely Rae Franklin. Emma participated in the barrels, poles, goats, breakaway roping and ribbon roping.  

There are 10 regions covering the state of Texas and the top 10 members in each event from each region come to the state finals to represent their regions. Out of 100-plus participants in each event at the finals, the top four performers are taken to the National Junior High Rodeo finals to represent the state. 

This year, the National Finals will be in Des Moines, Iowa. Emma is the 2021 state reserve pole bending champion and Zane is the 2021 state ribbon roping champion. 

Zane is the son of Sammy and Jessica Lattner of Livingston, and Emma is the daughter of Brad and Ashley Ivie of Livingston. Emma will be an eighth grader in the fall at Corrigan-Camden ISD and Zane will be a freshman. They will be in Iowa the week of June 20 to represent Texas versus the other states, as well teams from Mexico and parts of Canada. 

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Polk County commissioner decides not to spray for mosquitoes

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N1006P22004HFILE PHOTO Mosquito on human skin

By PCE Staff

East Texas has received its fair share of spring precipitation throughout the past few weeks. In Texas that usually means the heat and everyone’s favorite insect to hate — the mosquito — are right around the corner.

For many, the mosquitoes are already here, along with millions of their friends.

So why is Commissioner Guylene Robertson parking the truck that sprays for mosquitos down Precinct 1 county roads?

As it turns out, she also isn’t too fond of the insects. Yet, through conversations with commissioners from Polk and surrounding counties, she found that they aren’t spraying either.

Health effects are the main reason, as pesticides can cause both acute and chronic problems. Acute health effects appear shortly after exposure to some pesticides and can include skin and eye irritations, headaches, dizziness and nausea, weakness, difficulty breathing, mental confusion and disorientation.

“The times have changed environmentally, and things that were considered safe in the past are no longer acceptable or recommended,” Robertson said. “At this time, motor-driven mosquito spraying is in that category.”

Precinct 1 was the only in Polk County that has sprayed for mosquitoes over the past few years. However, the City of Livingston continues to do so. Roberston said the decision not to spray was one that was difficult.

“Due to the hazards and concerns environmentally Polk County Precinct 2, 3, and 4 have not sprayed for mosquitoes for several years,” Robertson said. “This summer, Precinct 1 will now be doing the same, while observing all environmental safety aspects.”

According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), several organophosphates, a class of insecticides, are highly toxic and poison insects and other animals, including birds, amphibians and mammals. Until the 21st century, they were among the most widely used insecticides available. Around 36 of them are presently registered for use in the United States, and all can potentially cause acute and subacute toxicity. Organophosphates are used in agriculture, homes, gardens and veterinary practices.

The EPA has a few suggestions in preventing mosquito bites. The first is to eliminate any standing water (even small amounts) to prevent mosquitoes from laying their eggs. If water cannot be eliminated, as in ornamental water features, use mosquito larvicide products (available at many retailers) or other pest control measures to minimize breeding opportunities. You may be able to add fish that eat larvae to a pond. Adding a fountain or aerator will keep the water and mosquitoes moving.

The agency suggests use of window and door screens to keep mosquitoes from entering your home, workplace, or children’s schools. Dress in light-colored clothing, long pants, and long sleeves. EPA-registered insect repellents will also prevent bites. Products that are EPA-registered have been confirmed to be safe and effective when label directions are followed.

There are several different homemade concoctions that can be found on the Internet. We have provided one such mix below.

HOMEMADE MOSQUITO SPRAY RECIPE

  • 1 bottle of blue mint mouthwash 
  • 3 bottles (per 12 oz) of stale beer (take the cheapest – it works as well)
  • 3 cups of Epsom salt

Pour beer and mouthwash into a container (an old saucepan, a bucket), stir and add the salt. Mix up the solution properly until salt is dissolved. Pour the mixture into a spray bottle. Shake well before use and spray areas where you spend time outside.

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PCSO seeking public’s assistance in locating burglar

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SUSPECT 2 UNKCOURTESY PHOTO Security camera footage of suspect

By PCE Staff

A burglar spotted in the act on security camera has been arrested, while another suspect remains at large.

The Polk County Sheriff's Office received a call Tuesday from a citizen who was alerted by his home security cameras. Two male subjects were inside a building on the victim’s property, located near Mangum Road.

The complainant provided an accurate description of the offenders as deputies responded to the area. Deputies and detectives quickly arrived on scene, located signs of forced entry into the building and observed several items of value placed by the door.

After conducting a search of the area, one of the suspects seen on the complainant's security camera was located and detained. He was immediately identified as Gary Eugene Penton, Jr. and found to be in possession of an item stolen from the complainant's property.

Penton, 47, of Livingston, was arrested without incident and booked into the Polk County Jail on the felony charge of burglary of a building.

Detectives are attempting to identify the other suspect involved in the burglary. The Polk County Sheriff's Office has requested the public view the two surveillance video photos of the second suspect involved.

If you recognize this suspect, or have information in this case or any other in Polk County, you are asked to submit a tip at p3tips.com, (the P3 App), or call Polk County Crime Stoppers at 936-327-STOP. Tipsters can remain anonymous and could collect a cash reward for information leading to an arrest. The Polk County Sheriff’s Office Criminal Investigation Division may also be contacted directly to speak with a detective at 936-327-6810.

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Mother and son arrested

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IMG 2052COURTESY PHOTO Confiscated narcotics

By PCE Staff

A mother and son were charged with felonies after the search of their residence on the north end of Polk County.

On Tuesday, officers with the Corrigan Police Department, assisted by deputies from the Polk County Sheriff’s Office and Precinct 3 Constable’s office, executed a search warrant and arrest warrant at the residence of a person described as a “known drug dealer” in Corrigan.

After a lengthy investigation, officers were able to obtain an arrest warrant for Eric Emerson, 39, of Corrigan, for delivery of marijuana. Officers were also able to obtain a search warrant for his residence in the city limits of Corrigan.

Upon arrival to the residence, Emerson met officers on the front porch, at which time, he was taken into custody without incident for the arrest warrant. Officers entered the premises and were met by a woman identified as Laurie Stephens, Emerson’s mother. Stephens, 60, of Corrigan, was said to be uncooperative with officers and repeatedly insisted on going back inside of her bedroom once she was detained.

A search of the residence yielded a variety of narcotics that included methamphetamine and marijuana. Several pipes used for smoking marijuana and methamphetamine, smalls scales, grinders, and several clear plastic baggies were also found in the residence.

Emerson was charged with delivery of marijuana, a state jail felony; and possession of marijuana, a class A misdemeanor. Stephens was charged with possession of controlled substance, penalty group 1, a state jail felony; and possession of marijuana, a class A misdemeanor.

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