Log in

Top Stories        News         Sports

  • Students inducted into Honor Society

    060321 honor societyCOURTESY PHOTO | CASSIE GREGORY Lincoln Junior High welcomed 14 new inductees into the National Junior Honor Society on May 25. They are (back row, from left) Lane Madison, Luke McClure, Alayna Rodriguez, Tess Phillips, Averey Moss, Hayden Richards, Angel-Joy Zane and Brayden Coker; and (front row, from left) Ashlynn Holley, Avery Keel, Averi Tucker, Cali Crowder and LJH NJHS Sponsor Aimie Patrick. Not pictured are Iliana Ferman and Haley Tullos.

    Special to the News-Times

    COLDSPRING — Lincoln Junior High School welcomed 14 new inductees into the National Junior Honor Society on May 25. 

    The NJHS elevates a school's commitment to the values of scholarship, leadership, character, service and citizenship. These characteristics are considered the five pillars of the NJHS, and have been associated with membership in the organization since its inception in 1929. 

    Current LJH NJHS members performed the induction ceremony, which included the symbolic lighting of five candles to represent the five pillars. Inductees were sworn in by repeating the following NJHS Pledge:

    "I pledge to uphold the high purposes of the National Junior Honor Society to which I have been selected. Striving in every way by word and deed to make its ideals the ideals of my school and of my life."

    Congratulations to LJH students Brayden Coker, Cali Crowder, Iliana Ferman, Ashlynn Holley, Avery Keel, Joel Lane Madison, Luke McClure, Averey Moss, Tess Phillips, Hayden Richards, Alayna Rodriguez, Averi Tucker, Haley Tullos and Angel-Joy Zane.

  • Students receive accolades

    011A5887TONY FARKAS | TCNS Students gathered to be recognized for their achievements.

    Academics, sports accomplishments noted with plaques, scholarships

    By Tony Farkas

    TRINITY — Athletic Director Patrick Goodman said the students and athletes of the school needed to be recognized for their efforts after such a tumultuous year, which teachers and coaches did at the annual awards ceremony, held Thursday.

    Thousands of dollars in scholarships and numerous awards were given to the students that excelled throughout the year.

    Goodman also brought back the tradition of naming athletes who went above and beyond — the Tiger Heart Award — which went to Zoey Grey and Emilio Cleveland. He also started an all-around athlete award, which went to Cynthia Sizemore and Treylin Goodman.

    Other awards include:

    UIL Academic Results

    District

    Brooke Kelley, first place Ready Writing; Emilio Cleveland, third place Computer Apps; Diego Lewin, fourth place Computer Apps; Hunter Cassidy, third place Current Issues, fifth place Computer Apps; Kaitlyn Smith, second place Prose Interpretation, third place Persuasive Speaking; Allie Ancira, fourth place Prose Interpretation; Izaiah Fortenberry, second place Informative Speaking; Paton Mauldin, second place Biology, third place Chemistry, fourth place Physics; Zachary Thibodeaux, second place Chemistry.

    Team Results

    First place, Science: Hunter Cassidy, Emilio Cleveland, Paton Mauldin, Zach Thibodeaux.

    Second place, Current Issues and Events: Hunter Cassidy, Emilio Cleveland, Paton Mauldin, Candida Guzman.

    Regional Results

    Izaiah Fortenberry, seventh place Informative Speaking; Kaitlyn Smith, fifth Persuasive Speaking; Zachary Thibodeaux, fourth place Biology.

    Sports Awards

    Cross country

    Boys and girls track

    Ava Morrison, cross country/track, regional cross country and area track, first-year letter winner; Kemberlie Caceras, track, area track, first-year letter winner; LaResa Green, track, area and regional qualifier, first-year letter winner; Aaliyah Hale, track, Area, first-year letter winner; Yesica Lopez, track , first-year letter winner; Yasmin Moore, track, area and regional qualifier, first-year letter winner; Daria Woods, track, Area track, first-year letter winner; Shania English, 23-3A District Champion 400 Meters, area and regional qualifier, Victoria Smith, area qualifier, Shelby Walters, Pole Vault, 23-3A District Champion Area Champion and regional qualifier, Anaya Weathersby, area and regional qualifier, Myona Wilson, area and regional qualifier, Zoey Gray, area qualifier, Cole Caldwell, first-Year track letter winner; Julian Clayborne, first-year track letter winner, area qualifier; Austin Cummins, first-year track letter winner; Marshall Sizemore, first-year track letter winner; Zylon Woods, first-year track letter winner; Tristan Williams, first-year track letter winner; Kaden Barnes, first-year track letter winner.

    Tennis

    Olivia Kitts, first-year letter winner, 23-3A second-place regional qualifier girls doubles; Natalie Bates, first-year letter winner, 23-3A second-regional qualifier girls doubles; Andrea Hickman, 23-3A District Champions girls doubles and regional qualifier; Gabby Kaufman, 23-3A District Champions girls doubles and regional qualifier, Team MVP; Dylan Ford, 3rd place boys singles; Paton Mauldin, Letter Award Winner

    Volleyball

    Cynthia Sizemore, first-team All-District, Co-MVP; Aniya Phillips, second-team All-District, Co-MVP.

    Soccer

    Melissa Acosta, first-year letter winner

    Athletic training, student aides

    Gabrielle Potts, 2 Years Varsity, first-year Letter Award Winner; Morgan Allbright, 2 Years Varsity, first-year Letter Award Winner

    Football, Bi-District Finalist

    Julian Clayborne, first-year letter winner; Navjot Gill, first-year letter winner, Academic All-District , UIL Scholar Award; Cole Hortman, first-year letter winner; Kaden Barnes, first-year letter winner; Romero Lopez, first-year letter winner; Trintin Fulsom, first-year letter winner, Academic All-District ; Randall Dumas, first-year letter winner, Academic All-District; Cole Odom, first-year letter winner; Treylin Goodman, Trinity first-team Running Back and second-team linebacker; Austin Cummins, Trinity, first-team Offensive Line and first-team Defensive Line, Academic All-District; Emilio Cleveland, Trinity, second-team Offensive Line , Academic All-District, UIL Scholar Award; Andrew Crabtree, Trinity, second-team Defensive Line; Fidencio Ruiz, Trinity, second-team Defensive Line, Academic All-District, UIL Scholar Award; Colton Smith, OL, Trinity, second-team Offensive Line

    Boys and girls basketball, Bi-District Finalist

    Nevaeh Craft, second-team All-District; Shania English, Honorable, Mention All-District; Peyton Robb, first-team All-District; Cynthia Sizemore, first-team All-District; Treylin Goodman, first-team All-District; Jakai Miller-Gates, first-team All-District; Terius Maxie, first-team All-District; Fermin Aleman, second-team All-District; Quinn Mack, Honorable Mention All-District, first-year Letter Award Winner; Tristian Martinez, first-year Letter Award Winner, Honorable Mention All-District, Academic All-District, ; Marshall Sizemore, first-year Letter Award Winner, Academic All-District; Cameron Anderson, first-year Letter Award Winner, Academic All-District; Cole Hortman, first-year Letter Award Winner

    Baseball

    Cole Hortman, first-year Letter Award Winner; Romero Lopez, first-year Letter Award Winner; Remi Lassman, first-year Letter Award Winner; David McKendree, first-year Letter Award Winner; Tristan Williams, first-year Letter Award Winner.

    Golf

    Anneliese Beasley, 23-3A Medalist, regional qualifier; Emilio Cleveland , Academic All-District; Hunter Cassidy, Academic All-District, UIL Scholar Athlete; Tyler Calloway, Academic All-District.

    Boys and girls powerlifting

    Deandra Mills, regional qualifier/medalist; Alyssa Hill, regional qualifier; Maria Mendoza, regional qualifier, first-year Letter Award Winner; Kailyn Fisher, Regional Champion, State Champion; Treylin Goodman, regional qualifier/medalist; Austin Cummins, regional qualifier.

    Softball

    Cynthia Sizemore, Defensive MVP; Dayanara Martinez, Utility Player of the Year, first-year Letter Award Winner; Peyton Robb, first-team All-District; Nevaeh Craft, second-team All-District; Abby Crowton, first-year Letter Award Winner; Brooke Arnold, first-year Letter Award Winner; Yasmin Moore, first-year Letter Award Winner.

  • Superheroes visit courthouse lawn

    super 1COURTESY PHOTO The San Jacinto County Child Welfare Board and San Jacinto County decorated the Courthouse lawn to raise awareness of child abuse in the county.

    By Judy Hester
    Secretary, SJC Child Welfare Board

    COLDSPRING — Each April the San Jacinto County Child Welfare Board, along with Child Protective Services and its parent agency, the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services, join hands with our local government, community groups, churches, service organizations and hometown citizens to put the spotlight on recognizing, preventing and reporting child abuse.

    It is a time to focus on ways not only to protect children but also to prevent abuse from ever occurring. This is a great opportunity for our county to make a difference in young lives, so during the month of April, residents that are concerned about the problem of child abuse are asked to wear blue.

    The Child Welfare Board's most dramatic statement concerning child abuse was the placement of a display of heroes on the courthouse lawn.

    The signs indicate "Children Need Heroes, but Abused Children Need Superheroes." Each star placed on the courthouse lawn represents a child who was abused during 2020, with the one black star indicating one child's death that tragically occurred that year.

    In Texas during 2020, there were 251 deaths with one in San Jacinto County. San Jacinto county had 205 investigations of child abuse, 76 of those being confirmed victims. This is a staggering number for our state and our county, and we should all accept the responsibility of making sure that in the future none of our children are ever included in these statistics.

    We can look away and often do look away, but the repercussions of child abuse are affecting people every day. Abused children are more likely to be substance abusers, perform poorly in school, or become juvenile delinquents.

    Millions of our tax dollars are spent annually to pay the financial price of child abuse from child protective services and foster care to the cost for court, law enforcement, hospital, medicine, and mental care.

    In 1989 a heartbroken grandmother, Bonnie Finney, took a stand against child abuse by tying a blue ribbon to the antenna of her minivan in remembrance of her late grandson, 3-year-old Bubba Dickenson.

    The body of Bubba was found bound, beaten and bruised in a weighted toolbox at the bottom of a canal. He had been killed by the boyfriend of the child's mother. Bonnie vowed to never forget the battered and bruised body of her grandson and uses the wearing of blue as a reminder to fight for the protection of all children against abuse.

    As you drive by the San Jacinto courthouse, you will notice the Child Abuse Prevention flag displayed on the flagpole during the month of April.

    Judge Fritz Faulkner and the Commissioner's Court issued an official proclamation declaring April as Child Abuse Prevention month. The Child Welfare Board decorated the gazebo on the courthouse lawn with blue ribbons to highlight the fight to end child abuse. April 25th was "Blue Sunday" and all churches in the county participated in a day of prayer for the children and families who have suffered.

    We must be the voice for our children and give them hope, courage  and love. Remember, residents are obligated by law to report suspected child abuse. If you suspect a child is in immediate danger, call 911. For all other cases in Texas, call the abuse and neglect hotline at (800) 252-5400. Let's all join hands and stop child abuse.

  • Suspect behind bars after scamming $42K

    Photo Zhang 6COURTESY PHOTO Hongwen Zhang, 32, was recently indicted by a Polk County grand jury for her role in a “secret shopper” scam that swindled a Livingston woman out of nearly $10,000.

    Special to the Enterprise

    LIVINGSTON – A woman is behind bars after scamming a Livingston woman and other people for a grand total of $42,000.

    On Nov. 27, law enforcement authorities with the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department arrested 32-year-old Hongwen Zhang, who was recently indicted by a Polk County grand jury for her role in a “secret shopper” scam that swindled a Livingston woman out of nearly $10,000.

    According to law enforcement reports, in March of this year, the victim was contacted by the defendant, or someone conspiring with the defendant, and they convinced the victim to act as a “secret shopper,” essentially someone who would visit local businesses and report back on the nature of the customer service received, the cleanliness of the store, etc. The scammers sent the victim several money orders as payment for the victim’s secret shopper services.

    It was not until the victim’s bank informed her that the money orders were fake that she realized she had been conned. But, by then, she’d already been convinced by the scammers to purchase several gift cards and provide them with the identifying information for the cards.

    The scammers used this information to transfer the nearly $10,000 stored on the cards to other gift cards. After receiving a report from the victim, investigators with the Polk County Sheriff’s Department were able to identify Zhang as a suspect.

    Zhang was tracked to a location in Houston, where investigators encountered her with 652 gift cards with more than $42,000 loaded onto them.

    “Because of the online and electronic nature of these types of crimes, most go unsolved,” stated Tommy L. Coleman, Special Crimes Prosecutor for the Polk County District Attorney’s Office. “But for the relentless investigation of this case by Polk County Sheriff’s Department Detective David Sottosanti, this case too, might have gone unsolved.”

    Zhang is charged with one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering, one count of conspiracy to commit fraudulent use/possession of identifying information, one count of conspiracy to commit fraudulent use/possession of credit card information and one count of theft from an elderly person as a party. The case is being prosecuted by Coleman. If convicted, Zhang faces up to 20 years confinement in a state prison.

    The investigation is still ongoing as it relates to the identification and apprehension of Zhang’s co-conspirators.

  • Taking the next step

    060321 groveton gradCourtesy photo | Martha Mericle Groveton ISD seniors celebrate their commencement with the traditional tossing of the mortarboards at the High School graduation on Friday.

    By Tony Farkas

    GROVETON — The Groveton High School on Friday celebrated the first post-pandemic graduation in style, and said farewell to 63 seniors with righteous pomp and circumstance.

    Family and friends cheered and hollered in the red-bedecked gymnasium, as the event was moved from the stadium due to weather, and the excitement was palatable.

    After a recitation of negativity that many students may feel, Valedictorian Emily Ecord said that students can be so focused on reaching the final goal that they lose sight of the importance of the individual moments.

    “It undermines the value you have in yourself, and the value you have in each of your peers,” she said. “Those moments make up your life.”

    Ecord also thanked the many people that have helped her find those moments throughout her high-school career.

    Salutatorian Cole Sullivan congratulated his fellow classmates in the best way possible, by evoking Dr. Seuss.

    “He teaches us life lessons — friendships, bonds, achievements, the hiccups, the failures, successes and relations,” he said. “Even though most people think of the ugly hairy cat in the red-and-white striped hat, Dr. Seuss went way beyond that.”

    Sullivan listed the five “simple” life lessons that he and his classmates could use from now on:

    • “Today, you are you, that’s truer than true. There is no one alive that is you-er than you.”
    • “Why fit in when you are born to stand out.”
    • “You have brains in your head, and feet in your shoes, you can steer yourself in any direction you choose.”
    • “Be who you are, and say what you think, because those who mind don’t matter, and those who matter don’t mind.”
    • “Today, I shall behave as if this is the day I will be remembered.”
  • TCSO investigating Sunday morning homicide

    CrimeScene

    By Chris Edwards

    SPURGER – Authorities are investigating a homicide that occurred early Sunday morning near Spurger.

    According to Tyler County Sheriff Bryan Weatherford, deputies responded to a residence located on FM 1013, west of Spurger at 1:45 a.m., in reference to an individual being shot.
    Weatherford said that once the deputies were on the scene, they observed several individuals standing over the victim, a male, who appeared to have been shot multiple times in the chest and stomach area. The man, whose identity is not being released at this time by Tyler County Sheriff’s Office, pending his family’s notifications, was pronounced dead at the scene by Pct. 4 Justice of the Peace Jim Moore. An autopsy will be conducted within the week in Beaumont.

    Weatherford said that prior to the victim being pronounced deceased, CPR was being administered to the victim, and the deputies assisted with medical attention until EMS arrived.

    TCSO deputies, along with Department of Public Safety state troopers were able to secure the scene and locate several shell casings near the victim’s body.

    Weatherford said that the residence was the scene of a party, where more than 100 individuals were gathered, yet “very little cooperation is being given by individuals that may have witnessed the shooting itself, or that are withholding information that could lead to the arrest of the suspect(s) responsible for this homicide.”

    The murder was especially shocking to Kendall Coleman, owner of Coleman’s Family Mortuary and a community leader in Woodville. The victim’s body was taken to Coleman’s mortuary, and he made a public video on Facebook on Sunday morning. He said he had been hanging out at the party the night before, and when he received the call to come recover the victim’s body, it shocked him. He called the crime a “senseless act.”

    “Somebody saw something, somebody knows something. I’m pleading to you (to come forward) …it happened right here, in Tyler County,” Coleman said, and added that whoever committed the crime needs to be held accountable. “Do the right thing, turn yourself in,” Coleman said in the video, addressing whoever is responsible.

    Coleman said although he did not know the victim, it seemed especially tragic when he learned the man was a father and said that he especially feels sorrow for his family.

    Weatherford said that the circumstances around the murder are giving investigators a hard time identifying who the actor(s) may be.

    Anyone with information is asked to call the Tyler County Sheriff’s Office at 409-283-2172, or Crime Stoppers at 936-639-TIPS. Tipsters calling into the Crime Stoppers hotline with information that leads to an arrest may be eligible for a cash reward.

  • Texas LawShield rep speaks at Lions Club

    Lions 2PHOTO BY JASON CHLAPEK I PCE Texas LawShield representative Gary Blalock speaks at Lions Club of Livingston last week at Cam Cho Yeh.

    By Jason Chlapek

    Self-defense is a necessity at times.

    There are times, however, when it can come back to haunt the person who defends itself. Gary Blalock knows this all too well.

    Blalock was the guest speaker at Lions Club of Livingston last week. He’s a representative of Texas LawShield – a legal defense program for self-defense.

    Blalock was once involved in a self-defense situation in which a legal defense program could’ve helped him. Unfortunately, Texas LawShield didn’t exist until 2009 and the incident involving Blalock took place in 2000.

    “I owned a bar and two patrons were involved in a fight,” Blalock said. “Then one of them assaulted one of my employees. The employee called me and I came to the bar to talk to them.”

    Once Blalock arrived on the scene, trouble ensued. The patrons were not in the mood to reason with him at first.

    “When I tried to stop them in the parking lot, they tried to run over me in their car,” Blalock said. “I drew my firearm and when they saw the laser beam pointed at them, they got out and were willing to talk. Fortunately, I didn’t have to use deadly force.”

    While Blalock wasn’t forced to use the firearm, the worst was yet to come. He soon found himself in legal trouble.

    “I found out a few days later that there was a warrant out for my arrest,” Blalock said. “They went in and filed a report against me and I had to take care of things legally.”

    Blalock had to pay approximately $4,000 in legal fees to prove that he acted in self-defense. He learned a valuable lesson from that fateful night.

    “I should’ve called law enforcement and filed a report,” Blalock said.

    Fast forward to 2010 and Blalock was with a former Marine friend at a gun show in Houston. It was there that he discovered Texas LawShield.

    “The people who found Texas LawShield was the law firm of Walker, Rice and Wisdom – a law firm in Houston,” Blalock said. “All three gentlemen are from the Houston area and it was found in 2009. I became a member then went to work for it six months later. I became a member because of what it cost me in legal fees 20 years ago. One of my former Marine buddies still works for the company. He introduced me to the attorneys at a gun show at the George Brown Convention Center. They explained to me what they do and how they protect us. For $10.95 a month, all of my legal defense is covered.”

    Blalock has been involved with Texas LawShield since 2010. First as a member and now as a representative.

    “The benefits are you have 24-hour access to a live attorney on an emergency hotline,” Blalock said. “When you’re in an ‘aww shucks’ moment and you’ve had to use force or deadly force, I want to know that I can contact my attorney and they’re going to be on their way to defend me. That’s the big thing. The fact that it’s so inexpensive, I don’t have to worry about going into my Dave Ramsey emergency fund, my retirement or the mortage for my house because all of my legal defense is covered because of this great program.”

    Texas LawShield is under the U.S. LawShield umbrella. Blalock also discussed some of the coverages associated with the program.

    “They offer additional coverages such as gunowner identity theft, multi-state protection and family protection,” he said. “I have my wife covered as well. I recommend this for everyone, especially now that we cover an individual for any kind of weapon. It no longer has to be a firearm. In today’s world, you see what happens. You have to defend yourself if someone attacks you. To me, it’s a no-brainer.”

    Especially when self-defense becomes a necessity.

  • The Texas Bucket List features Pit Row Pit Stop

    pit7COURTESY PHOTO Texas Bucket List host Shane McAuliffe (left) poses with Pit Row Pit Stop owner Frankie Vinci. McAuliffe’s show will feature Vinci’s restaurant this weekend.

    Special to the Enterprise

    LIVINGSTON – Take a step back in time into this retro 50’s diner that’s known for more than their burgers and shakes, they are known for what Texas is known for, Barbeque.

    Owner and Brooklyn born Californian Frankie Vinci went from building theme parks to building a diner to smoke barbeque like a true Texan.

    “I'm a Brooklyn boy, I had no clue what a brisket is. We don't cook brisket in Brooklyn. So, I had to learn four years ago and I guess I got good at it,” said Frankie.

    Not only does Frankie care about his brisket and ribs, he cares about his community and provides religious outreach for those in prison, since it was what helped him during his time behind bars.

    So, tune in on Feb. 13-14 as host Shane McAuliffe visits a righteous man with the gift of giving and great BBQ on The Texas Bucket List. Pit Row Pit Stop in Livingston is featured alongside two other stops - Zito’s in San Antonio and The Stephen F. Austin Statue in Angleton.

    Follow this link to find a station near you! https://thetexasbucketlist.com/where-to-watch.

    pit1COURTESY PHOTO Pit Row Pit Stop in Livingston will be featured this weekend on the Texas Bucket List.

    About the Texas Bucket List

    The Texas Bucket List, telling the tales of the Lone Star State one Texan's story at a time. The award-winning TV series shares the joy, wonder, beauty and excitement of Texas.

    Each week, host Shane McAuliffe sets out to add more people, places, food and music to a list that every Texan should experience. Shane has been recognized with numerous television broadcast excellence awards including a Regional Edward R. Murrow Award, three Lone Star Emmy Awards, the Barbara Jordan Media Award, several Telly Awards, and multiple Texas Association of Press Broadcasters awards.

    He’s a native of Round Rock, and attended The University of Houston. The Texas Bucket List is produced by McAuliffe Productions, LP located in College Station.

  • The Tolar Cabin: the other half of the story

    4EDDIE BOX The Tolar Cabin Kitchen on display at the Heritage Village Museum in Woodville.

    By Col Eddie Boxx

    The Tolar Cabin “dog trot” kitchen remains one of the more popular venues at the Heritage Village museum. Built in 1866 and originally located with the “main house” of the Tolar Cabin near Hillister, it was moved to the museum in 1965.

    The “squared-and-notch” log structure with its “mudcat” chimney represents an affluence not usually found in frontier buildings. However, after viewing, many inquisitive visitors (out of town and local) will ask the understandable follow-up question: “Where is the main cabin?”

    Thanks to the preservation efforts of Ray Hensarling and his family – we can tell you the Paul Harvey-like “rest of the story.”

    Originally constructed by Robert Jackson Tolar for his bride Mary Versailles “Versie” Durham, the cabin and kitchen were adjacent to each other but not connected (see painting). Understandably, the threat from wood-fueled kitchen fires along with the desire to keep the heat away from the rest of the house (especially in summer) made sense. Today, the main cabin remains in the same location – a few miles west of Hillister and situated on a ridge.

    Although ownership has changed over the last two centuries, Al Pritchard ultimately saved the building in 1975. Twenty years later, Ray Hensarling (current owner and steward) and Pat Foster fully restored the cabin in 1995. Nowadays, the building is meticulously maintained and decorated and serves as a unique architectural heritage to a bygone era. Additionally, the cabin (and kitchen) represents a connection to two important Tyler county families – the Tolars and Shivers.

    Robert Jackson Tolar was a nephew to Nancy (Tolar) Shivers (1813-1890), a fearless widow who moved her family via wagon to Texas in 1858 and settled 600 acres west of Woodville. According to the 1850 census, the westward move to Texas was a joint family undertaking as the Tolars lived next door to the Shivers in Simpson County, Mississippi. Located today near the Tyler County airport, the Magnolia Hills estate remains in the Shivers family. Nancy ultimately became the great-grandmother to one of the most influential politicians in Texas history – Gov. Allan Shivers. The quintessential log cabin remains identifiable to American, Texas and Tyler County history.

    When Woodville’s own Gov. Allan Shivers (the ever-astute politician) was running for office (and his family’s Magnolia Hills cabin had long ago cease to exist) jokingly quipped, “I wasn’t born in a log cabin, so I built one.”

    To learn more about the Tolar Cabin or to see for yourself a wonderfully preserved 1866 pioneer kitchen, please visit the Heritage Village Museum or call (409) 283-2272 / (800) 323-0389 or visit our website at: https://www.heritage-village.org.

    Col. Eddie Boxx (Ret., USAF) teaches at Baylor University and writes for the Heritage Village Museum – an organization dedicated to the education and preservation of Tyler County history.

  • Top of the class (GALLERY)

    Academic Award Dyanne VasquestCOURTESY PHOTO Academic Award Dyanne Vasquest

    SJNT Staff

    On May 13, the Shepherd held its academic and athletic banquet, and honored students that excelled in their respective sport, as well as in learning.

    Getting through the school year, given the challenges over the past year, is an achievement all students can be proud of.

    Academic Award Dyanne Vasquest
    Academic Award Winner Christian Castillo
    Athletic Trainers of the Year. David Benkowski and Graycie Weaver
    Baseball MVP Dillen Johnson
    Basketball MVP Brad Davis
    Cross Country MVPs Dillen Johnson and Grace Ramos
    Fighting Heart Award Winners Jackson Ellingburg and Shelby Dean
    Football MVP Brice Major
    Gary Corn Memorial Award Winner Autumn Phillips
    Gary Corn Memorial Award Winner Walker Windt
    Girls Basketball MVP Grace Ramos
    Madison Smith Cheer MVP
    Most Athletic Dillen Johnson
    Most Athletic Female Cheyenne Lowrance
    Powerlifting MVPs Lain Baker and Shelby Dean
    Softball MVP Kaylee Barlow
    Tennis MVPs Kristi Hinzie and Valentina Beiza
    Track MVPs HD Green and Grace Ramos
    Volleyball MVPs Kristi Hinze and Jordan Watkins
    Previous Next Play Pause
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
  • Trinity County approves contract with Groveton EMS

    trinityFILE PHOTO - Trinity County courthouse

    By Tony Farkas

    GROVETON — The Trinity County Commissioners Court now has a new contract with Groveton EMS for ambulance services, but not without some discussion as to the nature of the $1,500 monthly payment.

    While both the county and Groveton EMS agree that ambulance service is needed, the county on Nov. 10 approved a $1,500 monthly stipend, while the EMS service sought a contract that was based on a fee for services.

    Grover Worsham, who owned the service and sold it to current owner David Robison, said he understood Robison’s position, but the real issue was getting the ambulances to run.

    Robison initially asked for the contract to read fee for services as it would benefit the organization in the long run; his argument was that the language made the difference between a vendor relationship and a dependent relationship. However, County Judge Doug Page said the contract will read subsidy based on advice from County Attorney Joe Warner Bell.

    In the end, both sides agreed that it would be best to end the negotiations and approve the contract. The previous contract expired in December 2019. This contract will last seven years with a 90-day right of termination.

    In other business, the county:

    • canvassed the county votes from the Nov. 3 General Election;
    • approved $332,106 from the October check register;
    • approved a budget amendment moving $7,952 into the general fund;
    • approved issuing a county credit card to Sheriff Woody Wallace;
    • approved disbursing Family Protection Fee funds to three county agencies;
    • approved the sale of surplus equipment;
    • approved bids for the sale of tax resale properties from the County Appraisal District; and
    • approved a resolution authorizing $35,000 in county funds as part of a Community Development Block Grant, a project sponsored by the Deep East Texas Council of Government, for the improvement of regional radio communications infrastructure.
  • Trinity County Fair and Youth Livestock Show 2021 Results (GALLERY)

    untitled 2TONY FARKAS | TCNS Centerville ISD Ag Teacher Kelly Dial shows students the proper way to transport chickens during the Broiler Show during the Trinity County Fair and Livestock Sale on Wednesday.

    TCNS STAFF

    The Trinity County Fair and Youth Livestock Show 2021 was a complete show, judging all animals and placing all projects. The sale generated approximately $169,850 in sales and $20,975 in add-ons.

    Previous Next Play Pause
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

    Fair Results

    Market Fryers

    Lexi Larson, Groveton 4-H, Grand Champion; Parker Leach, East County 4-H, Reserve Champion; Adriana Sottosanti, Groveton 4-H, 3rd; Cade Mauldin, Trinity 4-H, 4th; Gunner Hollis, East County 4-H, 5th; Faith Smith, East County 4-H, 6th; Reece Watts, Groveton 4-H, 7th; Braxton Rogers, Centerville 4-H, 8th; Clarissa Ashworth, Centerville FFA, 9th; Kenneth Smith, East County 4-H, 10th; Tripp Turner, East County 4-H, 11th; Mikala Rivers, Groveton 4-H, 12th; Aurora Gonzalez, 13th; Cooper Shanafelt, Groveton 4-H, 14th; Payzlea Davis, East County 4-H, 15th; Wesson Burriss, Groveton 4-H, 16th; Skyler Shaw, Groveton FFA, 17th; Klarysa Peterson, Centerville 4-H, 18th; Samatha Hittner, Groveton 4-H, 19th; Rebecca Braswell, Centerville 4-H, 20th; Hunter Anderson, Centerville 4-H, 21st, Madelyn Bergman, Groveton FFA, 22nd; Dailey Turner, 23rd, Hannah Turner, East County 4-H, 24th; Madison Haislip, Groveton 4-H, 25th; Bentley Thompson, Groveton 4-H, 26th; Mekenna Meshell, Trinity 4-H, 27th.

    Market Broilers

    Haygen Townsend, Groveton 4-H, Grand Champion; Rhett Hawkins, Groveton 4-H, Reserve Champion; Tristin Eddins, East County 4-H, 3rd; Logan Townsend, Groveton FFA, 4th; Avery Brown, Centerville 4-H, 5th; Hardy Brown, Centerville 4-H, 6th; Trey Page, Groveton 4-H, 7th; Samantha McMullen, Apple Springs FFA, 8th; Jake Snyder, Centerville 4-H, 9th; Payson Dickinson, Centerville FFA, 10th; Aiden Conner, East County 4-H, 11th; Zoey Perez, Groveton 4-H, 12th; Gabriel (Julio) Perez, Groveton 4-H, 13th.

    Market Steers

    Laney Peterson, East County 4-H, Grand Champion; Kayla Kembro, Trinity 4-H, Reserve Champion; Andrew Kembro, Trinity 4-H, 3rd; Makala Rowe, 4th; Lucas Sottosanti, Groveton 4-H, 5th; Cade White, East County 4-H, 6th; Clayton Tullos, Apple Springs FFA, 7th; Reese White, Groveton FFA, 8th; Madison Nash, Groveton FFA, 9th; Brody Thornton, Groveton FFA, 10th; Austin Wallace, Trinity 4-H, 11th; Alivia Wallace, Trinity FFA, 12th.

    Market Lambs

    Malley Ecord, Groveton 4-H, Grand Champion; Megan Hannah, Groveton 4-H, Reserve Champion; Abbey Thornton, Groveton 4-H, 3rd; Katie Davis, East County 4-H, 4th; Brenley Fuller, Groveton 4-H, 5th.

    Commercial Heifers

    Emily Ecord, Groveton FFA, Grand Champion; Conner King, Groveton 4-H, Reserve Champion; Reed Hawkins, Groveton 4-H, 3rd; Rylie Due, Groveton 4-H, 4th; Cash Moore, Groveton 4-H, 5th; Cole Sullivan, Groveton 4-H, 6th; Jasper Due, Groveton 4-H, 7th; Hannah Page, Groveton 4-H, 8th; Lauren Moore, Groveton 4-H, 9th; Haley Denman, Apple Springs FFA, 10th; Jack Sullivan, Groveton 4-H, 11th.

    Swine

    Landree Martin, Grand Champion; Jace Taylor, Groveton 4-H, Reserve Champion; Peyton Noack, Centerville 4-H, 3rd; Kaileigh Lopez, 4th; Chase Blair, 5th; Colter Hajovsky, 6th; Jackson Cathey, 7th; Hayley Hajek, 8th; Chasity Blair, Groveton 4-H, 9th; Tanner Steubing, 10th; Kade Rosser, 11th; Kutter Minter, Groveton 4-H, 12th; Asa Stewart, Groveton 4-H, 13th; James Hennigan, Centerville FFA, 14th; Ethan Bowling, Groveton 4-H, 15th; Trey Brooks, 16th; Mercedes Wilson, Groveton 4-H, 17th; Laura Rogers, Centerville 4-H, 18th; Gracie May, Centerville FFA, 19th; Ashton Ashford, 20th; A.J. Lopez, Groveton 4-H, 21st; Raylee Boggs, Centerville 4-H, 22nd; Darbi Parker, Groveton 4-H, 23rd; Brance Dial, Centerville 4-H, 24th; Addison Randal, Groveton 4-H, 25th; Jill Watts, 26th; Ian Utz, 27th; Alexis May, Centerville FFA, 28th; Milton Riley Pitts, 29th; Serenity Stanley, 30th; Kyleigh Eddins, Centerville 4-H, 31st; Ethan Rutledge, Centerville FFA, 32nd; Jada Welch, Centerville FFA, 33rd; Sarah Sallas, 34th; Hunter Bowling, Groveton 4-H, 35th; Savannah Woodrick, 36th; Cooper Campbell, East County 4-H, 37th; Wyatt Turner, East County 4-H, 38th; Katie Blanchard, 39th; Ty Havard, Centerville FFA, 40th; Melony Allen, 41st; Gage Hollis, Apple Springs FFA, 42nd; Hunter Davis, Apple Springs FFA, 43rd; Wesley Maxfield, Centerville FFA, 44th; Weston Dial, Centerville FFA, 45th; Kate Roger, Centerville FFA, 46th; Colton Brausell, Centerville FFA, 47th; Daniel Brister, Centerville 4-H, 48th; Jaycee Hildebrand, East County 4-H, 49th; Kayla Mott, Centerville FFA, 50th; Kathryn Turner, Apple Springs FFA, 51st; Samantha Smith, Centerville FFA, 52nd.

    Goats

    Brianna Davison, Groveton FFA, Grand Champion; Karly Abshier, Groveton 4-H, Reserve Champion; Jett Arbuckle, Groveton 4-H, 3rd; Anna LaRue, 4th; Ayla Abshier, Groveton 4-H, 5th; Marlie Murray, East County 4-H, 6th; Maycynn Meshell, Trinity 4-H, 7th; Zachary Davison, Groveton 4-H, 8th; Preston Murray, East County 4-H, 9th; Miley Hannah, Groveton 4-H, 10th; Tanner Smith, Apple Springs FFA, 11th; Clay Ashworth, Centerville FFA, 12th; Olivia Smith, Apple Springs FFA, 13th; Eryn Eaton, Trinity FFA, 14th; Emily Brister, Apple Springs FFA, 15th; Leo Conner, Centerville FFA, 16th.

  • Trinity County Fair kicks off early (VIDEO)

    031721 fair 2TONY FARKAS | TCNS Trey Page tends to his chickens prior to the Broiler Show during the Trinity County Fair and Livestock Sale on Wednesday March 10, 2021.

    By Tony Farkas

    GROVETON — After a year without, the Trinity County Fair & Youth Livestock Show kicked off Wednesday — with just a few changes.

    Instead of a weekend affair, the shows have been spread out over four days to keep in compliance with CDC guidelines, said Fair Board President Bill Wagner.

    On Wednesday, rabbits and chickens were checked in and judged; Thursday will see steers and lambs; Friday will be goats and swine; and Saturday will feature the livestock sale.

    Even so, Wagner said the first day was going fine. In all, there are 146 entries: 15 steers, five lambs, 18 goats, 57 hogs, 11 heifers, 13 broilers and 27 fryers.

    The remaining schedule for the week is:

    Wednesday

    1 p.m. Fryer show

    4:30 p.m. Commercial heifers test and record book turn-in at the Groveton High School Ag Building.

    Thursday

    7:30 a.m. Steer sift

    8-10 a.m. Heifers, lambs and steers check-in.

    11 a.m. Heifer show

    1 p.m. Lamb show

    3 p.m. Steer show

    Friday

    8-10 a.m. Goats, hogs check-in

    2 p.m. Goat show

    5 p.m. Hog show

    Saturday

    5 p.m. Online and live auction

  • Trinity County Fair set to kick off

    FAIRTRINITY COUNTY FAIR LOGO

    Special to the News-Standard

    GROVETON — The Trinity County Fair and Youth Livestock Show is slated for the third week in March in Groveton at the County Fairgrounds.

    It all starts Tuesday, March 16.

    The Fair will be a little different this year because of masking and social distancing requirements; board members decided to spread the show out over more days to eliminate having so many people in the barn at the same time.

    Patrons also are requested to wear masks. Additionally, there will be no pet show this year.

    Despite the changes, there will be a host of animals and student projects to see and a limited concession stand will offer refreshments.

    Students from 4-H and FFA from Apple Springs, Centerville, Groveton, and Trinity schools are expected to compete.

    Awards will be given at the conclusion of each show.

    All buyers are welcome, and add-ons will be accepted.

    There will be an online auction at Wal-Lee Auction Co. Inc. Online bidding starts March 15 at walleeauctioncompany.com.

    For information, call Show Secretary Laura Worsham Anderson at (936) 465-0110 or President Bill Wagner at (713) 501-6733.

    Schedule of Events

    Wednesday, March 17

    Shop projects should be entered between 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. but will be accepted up till 5 p.m. for the sale. Judging will start at 2 p.m.

    8-10 a.m. Fryers and broilers check-in

    11 a.m. Broiler show at

    1 p.m. Fryer show

    Commercial Heifer test and record book due at 4:30 p.m. at the Groveton High School Ag Building

    Thursday, March 18

    7:30 a.m. Steer sift begins

    8-10 a.m. Commercial heifers, lambs, and steers check-in

    11 a.m. Heifer show

    1 p.m. Lamb show

    3 p.m. Steer show

    Friday, March 19

    8-10 a.m. Goats and hogs check-in

    2 p.m. Goat show

    5 p.m. Hog show

    Saturday, March 20

    5 p.m. Online/live auction begins at 5 p.m. starting with shop projects and the animal projects.

    Only the Grand Champion and Reserve Champions will walk at the auction. All projects will be sold.

  • Trinity County gets pushback

    CountysealFILE PHOTO Trinity County seal

    Concern about contract for vehicles results in argument, no action

    By Tony Farkas

    GROVETON — Concerns raised by the Trinity County Treasurer over a contract for Sheriff’s Office vehicles with Enterprise Fleet two weeks ago led to a battle between elected officials on March 23.

    It also led to Sheriff Woody Wallace asserting his sole authority over the Sheriff’s Office, saying he was the only one to decide what vehicles he and his deputies will drive, and that the Commissioners Court’s only responsibilities were to provide vehicle replacements and approve finances.

    He also said the court has been less than supportive in the matter.

    Wallace also cautioned Treasurer Bob Dockens about meddling in areas that are not of his concern, saying that according to the State Constitution, that was a crime.

    “These people in this room, they elected me sheriff,” Wallace said before a packed courtroom. “They did not elect Bob (Dockens) sheriff. It’s my job as sheriff to operate this department.

    “My authority is granted by the constitution as to what I can and cannot do. when one elected official interferes with another elected official he has committed a crime for trying to influence another office. You cannot do it.

    Commissioner Neal Smith said he put the item on the agenda today because questions have been raised over the last month regarding the contract, and that Wallace brought the contract forward because no one could not buy vehicles as the manufacturers had shut down production.

    He also said there is no one on the court more supportive of the department; he said that everything Wallace has asked for he has gotten, and that day’s discussion, and another item to purchase vehicles outright, should indicate that.

    Addressing the meeting, which was moved to the grand courtroom because of the crowd, Dockens said that at a Commissioners Court meeting two weeks ago, he brought up concerns after he was asked by the auditor to take a look at the contract, basically regarding the interest rate being charged and actual vehicle ownership.

    Dockens also said he was told by Wallace at the last meeting that if he could find some vehicles, he should; Wallace interrupted, saying he was being facetious.

    However, Dockens said he talked with several dealers in the area that had vehicles ready to go.

    “All I was doing was exploring if there were other places that had vehicles ready, because if we can buy them then let’s do that,” Dockens said.

    Wallace disputed that account, saying the information he received from the same dealers was the vehicles were 90 days out. He also was adamant about being the only one to run his department; saying the Sheriff decides what the Sheriff’s Department drives.

    Dockens said he only got involved because he was asked to look into it and because his office is in charge of risk management.

    “I have a problem with one man getting you to cancel a contract that we’ve already signed,” Wallace said. “I have a problem with anyone getting involved; this is between me and this court.

    “The commissioners can only tell me what I can spend,” Wallace said. “They cannot tell me what I can or cannot drive. The people of the county deserve officers that operate in safe vehicles that are not worn out or subject to crash. It’s a known fact that in the automotive world that vehicles wear out at 150,000 miles. We operate vehicles at 120 mph every day.”

    County Attorney Colton Hay said he was asked to review the contract by Dockens, and to “get ahead of” some misinformation provided by Dockens, he did the review.

    Hay said he thought the contract was standard and a good deal, and since the contract has been signed, work has been done by Enterprise.

    “If we back out of this contract because Dockens has cold feet, even though he was not in on the contract from the beginning, that could potentially cost us everything they’ve spent without any of the benefits,” Hay said. “I urge you to remember you agreed to it, and nothing’s changed except one person got involved that wasn’t in on it at the beginning and didn’t understand it all because it was not his department.

    “I don’t think this is too good to be true,” Hay said.

    Commissioner Tommy Park, a former law enforcement officer, said he took things upon himself to find answers for the questions the court and treasurer had, and then relayed those answers to everyone concerned.

    Smith said that no action was needed on his agenda item as he withdrew his objections; however, he said that in the future, there will be no votes whatsoever until everything is understood by the court.

  • Trinity County now papers boats

    031821 boatsTONY FARKAS | TCNS Nancy Due Shanafelt, Trinity County tax assessor/collector, goes through paperwork and fee schedules regarding boat registration, which is a service the county will begin providing residents.

    By Tony Farkas

    GROVETON — Trinity County now has the ability to provide titles and registrations for all your boating needs.

    County Tax Assessor/Collector Nancy Due Shanafelt said the county has gotten all necessary approvals and will now register and title boats and motors in the county. Previously, boat owners had to go to Lufkin or elsewhere to have that done.

    “We have our login information, we have our forms printed out, and we even have the people waiting to register their boats,” she said. “But, we’re waiting on the stickers and supplies to be sent here from the state.”

    Shanafelt said registration is required for any boat to be on a Texas waterway. The county will start registrations no later than April 1, but only in Groveton; the Trinity annex will be able to do registrations once the bugs are ironed out.

    “I campaigned on staying open for lunch, which we’re on our second week of that; taking credit cards, which has been a hit; and the third was boat registration,” she said.

    Shanafelt said that this will be the first time the county will provide the service.

    “Anything for the people,” she said. “We can keep them here, and make a little money for the county.”

    Registration fees are based on the length of the craft, varying from $32 for boats 16 feet or smaller, and $53 for craft from 16 to 26 feet; Shanafelt said the $32 fee will be the most common.

    Additional fees include $22 for a replacement sticker, and $27 for a title.

    “I think we have 1,300 boats in Trinity County, and they need to be registered every two years,” she said. “There’s a lot to it, but it’s a great service for the people of the county.”

  • Trinity County's New Attorney looks to implement change (VIDEO)

    011421 colton hayTONY FARKAS | TCNS Colton Hay took the reins of the Trinity County Attorney’s office on January 4, 2021, hitting the ground running.

    By Tony Farkas

    GROVETON — Colton Hay walked into the office at 8 a.m. on the first day to a ringing telephone and only him to answer it.

    The newly minted County Attorney, elected in November to replace Joe Warner Bell, was being asked about creating a protective order. Hay said he had to call around that morning to find out what the protocol and procedures were.

    “I started calling around, and Rana Wingo of the SAAFE House was able to help me out, and what I found reaching out to people is that no one really knew exactly what to do, where a protective order was supposed to start,” he said.

    Hay went immediately to work, setting up meetings with Wingo, the Sheriff’s Office and the DA’s office, as well as other entities involved, and together created a step-by-step process — that was on the second day.

    “That’s what I’m looking to do — update things, trying new things, something you can only do when you’re new and don’t really know exactly what to do,” Hay said. “(The new procedure) will be great for the victims, for everyone, and I don’t want to stop there, with protective orders and criminal cases, I want to keep going and bring that new insight to the office.”

    The word update sums up Hay’s entire campaign.

    “We’re looking to get new computers, and we, with the DA and the Sheriff, are looking into software that will connect all of us, to expedite things,” he said. “I want to get everyone communicating.”

    Hay said he hopes to bring some youthful energy to the position. Having just got married, he said he wants to put down roots, and saw the election as a good opportunity to do that.

    Hay graduated law school in 2017, and worked for an insurance defense firm for the nephew of Joe Ned Dean, who gave him some sage advice.

    Hay also is a former clerk for the Trinity County District Attorney Bennie Schiro, and has worked in Anderson County for two years doing the essentially the same work as he is doing now. He said he brings experience and a fresh perspective to the position.

  • Trinity gets the spirit (VIDEO)

    IMG 3741 copyTONY FARKAS | TCNS Trinity residents enjoy the mild weather during the downtown Christmas celebration on Saturday December 5, 2020.

    By Tony Farkas
    Julia McMichael

    TRINITY — Vendors sold their goods and Santa was singing; children were laughing and bells were ringing.

    Baked goods and dancing and sleighs full of bling, these were Trinity’s favorite things.

    On Saturday December 5, 2020, Trinity residents were treated to its annual Christmas celebration, although organizers had to make some changes to accommodate social distancing in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly cancelling the parade of lights.

    However, Julia McMichael of the Trinity Peninsula Chamber of Commerce said the event was wonderful.

    IMG 3762TONY FARKAS | TCNS Misty Dowdell dances with 4-year-old Alexis Adkisson while Santa serenades the crowd with Christmas carols.

    “We had more than 200 people,” she said. “Vendors said they made money and had a steady stream of people.”

    McMichael said the day was excellent, full of sunshine and fun, and people wore masks and were cautious.

    “We wanted to have something to lift the spirits of the community, and we did that,” she said. “Vendors said they had pretty good traffic and were looking forward to next year.”

    Since there were no contestants in the ugly sweater contest, there were two other sets of awards given: cutest baby and best costume.

    In the cutest baby contest, first place went to 4-month-old Aria Suttle, second place was Christi Ann Harrelson, and third went to Caroline Suttle.

    For best costume, there was a three-way tie for first — Tiffany Sanchez and Natalie and Jesus Reyes; second went to Delilah Poehl; and third place also was a tie — Carolyn and Valorie Cleveland.

    imagejpeg 1001COURTESY PHOTO Santa’s sleigh, which was parked this year due to COVID restrictions, still was a hit with Trinity residents.

  • Trinity High School graduates senior class

    060321 trinity grad 2TONY FARKAS | TCNS Valedictorian Hunter Cassidy addresses the crowd and assembled students during the Trinity High School Graduation on Saturday at Sam Houston State University.

    72 cross the stage

    By Tony Farkas

    HUNTSVILLE — “I LOVE YOU, JIMMY” rang out, along with other exclamations of praise and congratulations, laughter and not a few tears, after the Trinity High School seniors’ processional.

    THS held its graduation ceremony Saturday at Sam Houston State University’s Bernard G. Johnson Coliseum in Huntsville.

    In all, 72 students tossed the mortarboards as they were declared graduates by Principal Brittaney Cassidy.

    Salutatorian Emilio Cleveland thanked those in attendance for being there for the students’ final steps in their high-school careers, and the first steps into bright futures.

    “The start of this year was different than any year we have experienced,” he said. “It was the first year back from the pandemic, and we had to adapt to the new life at school. Luckily, the faculty supported us the entire way, and on behalf of the class, I would like to thank you for that dedication.”

    Cleveland also thanked his coaches for their inspiration, with a coach quoting Zig Ziglar to him: “You can’t have million-dollar dreams with a minimum-wage mindset.”

    Hunter Cassidy, the valedictorian, said the year was not an easy one for students or faculty, but the dedication of the faculty help see it through.

    “It has taken us 12 years to get to this chapter in our lives, and as this one concludes, I am thankful for all the good times we’ve had together, and to all the memories we have made,” he said. “The friendships we have made will stay with us for the rest of our lives.”

    Sitting here today is proof, Hunter said, that they are capable of rising to any challenge.

    “Time keeps moving forward no matter what we do,” he said. “Remember, when life gets hard, throws a few curveballs our way, keep your head up and look to the future, because before you know it, you will be there.”

    060321 trinity grad 1TONY FARKAS | TCNS Trinity High School seniors celebrate their graduation on Saturday by tossing their hats in the air.

  • Trinity Historical society dedicates markers to Rep. Charlie Wilson and 'Wobbly Bobbly'

    111220 plaque 2TONY FARKAS | TCNS Sharon Wilson Allison, sister to Charlie Wilson, reads the text of a Texas Historical Marker that was dedicated to the U.S. Representative on Saturday November 7, 2020 in Trinity, Texas.

    By Tony Farkas

    TRINITY — Millions of Google returns on a search, as well as a movie, might give some folks a passing familiarity for Rep. Charlie Wilson, who served in the U.S. House of Representatives for 24 years.

    For the residents of Trinity, though, Little Charles, as he was known, was the definition of the hometown boy who done good. Because of that, on Saturday an official Texas Historical Marker was dedicated at his boyhood home.

    The Trinity Historical Society also dedicated a marker to the “Wobbly Bobbly,” the Waco, Beaumont, Trinity and Sabine Railroad on Saturday.

    Wilson was born in Trinity on June 1, 1933, and served in both the Texas Legislature and the U.S. House, representing the districts around his home town. He died Feb. 10, 2010, in Lufkin, Texas.

    Susan Madeley of the Trinity County Historical Commission said that there were many accomplishments made by the congressman, particularly with funding for Afghan rebels during that country’s war with the Soviet Union in the 1980s, the subject of the movie “Charlie Wilson’s War.”

    Wilson also was a champion in business and environmental arenas as well, and was known as a consummate dealmaker.

    Sharon Wilson Allison, Charlie’s sister, said she cherished the memories of her time in Trinity and her brother.

    “(My family) would be so honored that you were here,” she said. “Thank you for doing this.”

    Earlier on Saturday, on the southwest corner of Main and Maple streets, the commission dedicated and unveiled a marker commemorating the Waco, Beaumont, Trinity and Sabine Railroad, which was known affectionately by the people of the time as the Wobbly Bobbly Turnover and Stop.

    111220 plaque 1 TONY FARKAS | TCNS Historians Jason Rose (left) and Everett Lueck unveil a Texas Historical Marker that was dedicated to the WBT&S Railroad on Saturday in Trinity, near the site of the now-defunct railroad’s home offices.

    The railroad was chartered in September 1881, and was used primarily as a logging tram, as the area to this day is a large producer of timber. Over the 115.2 miles of track, passengers, mail, pulpwood, tomatoes, vehicles and oil, among other freight, was transported, according to the marker request application compiled by Jason Rose and Madeley.

    It stopped operation in 1959, and the remaining engine was restored and is on display at the Galveston Railroad Museum.