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Trinity Standard - Local News

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Missing woman's body found in Sam Houston National Forest
Trinity Standard -

 

By Jamie Nash Officials are seeking answers in the death of 55-year-old Theresa Kirkpatrick of Conroe, whose body was found in the Sam Houston National Forest around 10 a.m. Saturday, July 29 after her husband Alan reported her missing in that area around 4:30 p.m. Friday. Law enforcement is saying little about the ongoing investigation, but her brother had plenty to say, and he believes Alan Kirkpatrick is to blame. According to officials and family members, Alan Kirkpatrick claimed they went Friday morning to retrieve a motorcycle that was stuck in the woods off Stubblefield Lake Road. He said he lost sight of his wife at some point and was unable to find her after that. Alan Kirkpatrick allegedly told authorities he didn't report her missing for eight hours because he was trying to find her on his own. However, Theresa Kirkpatrick's brother, Mike Keiser, painted a very different picture as he stood in the dense forest where she was found. "My sister would never have been in these woods," Keiser said. "She had herniated disks in her back, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and emphysema." Theresa Kirkpatrick was also overweight, weighing around 200 pounds and 5 feet 2 inches tall, adding to the difficulty she would have had going deep into a thicket. Keiser said she was doing good if she could tolerate the heat on her own porch for 20 to 30 minutes. "She doesn't go hiking," Keiser said. "She doesn't even go out in her yard. Her medical condition won't allow it." He claims when he visited Alan Kirkpatrick Saturday morning, his brother-in-law appeared to be crying but had no actual tears. That visit was when Keiser was able to get a better location than the police had on where his sister would be found. He said the police were given four different stories on Friday, and none of the locations indicated in those stories were correct. He said he was unsure whether his brother-in-law realized he was giving him the right location when he said it, since it was not where he'd told officers to look the previous evening. Adding to his suspicion of Alan Kirkpatrick's involvement in Theresa's death, Keiser also says his sister did not ride motorcycles and physically incapable of climbing on one. He repeatedly commented that his sister was "taken" from him, but said the police had asked him not to say anything more to the media, fearing he might jeopardize their investigation. Keiser said he last spoke to Theresa Kirkpatrick on Sunday, and "everything was okay." However, he said there was a history of violent incidents involving his sister and brotherin- law during their marriage that he estimated to be of 25 to 30 years. Law enforcement said they had no history of reports of domestic violence with the couple, but Keiser said some of their family members had stepped in at times to defend her from physical abuse. "Alan goes into rages. We knew he hit her, but she didn't even want to tell us," he said. "She was afraid we'd do something." Keiser, who learned of his sister's disappearance through Facebook, said his sister was not a violent person, but very loving, which made her death all the more difficult. "My sister was an amazing person," he said. "She loved her family she was very loved by her family. She was taken from us, and didn't deserve what she got. She never hurt a soul." Keiser said now that his sister has been found, his family is hoping to learn what really happened to her, or as he put it, "what (her husband) did". He choked back tears as he told that his sister had helped raise him and his brother, and was always there for them "no matter what." Tim Whitecotton, of the Walker County Sheriff's Department said Kirkpatrick was found in that county. His agency was notified by MCSO that she was found in their jurisdiction, off of Forest Service Road 208, off of a multi-use trail. "A lot of times people get these confused with city parks and it's not," Whitecotton said. "It's a very dense rural area, and with the heat and the humidity that we're experiencing right now in the area it's very dangerous and very treacherous." Walker County investigators are being assisted by the Texas Rangers and the Forest Service. The search effort and investigation involved multiple other agencies, including Montgomery County Sheriff's Office, Montgomery County Search and Rescue, New Waverly Fire Department, TDCJ K-9 units, and there were fire and EMS command posts. Whitecotton said there were no visible signs of trauma and the victim has been transported to Montgomery County Forensic Services for autopsy.

 

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